Saturday 1 October 2016

Gloria Hunniford: Victoria Derbyshire's breast cancer video diary 'invaluable'

Published 15/10/2015 | 13:41

Gloria Hunniford said she admired Victoria Derbyshire and her video diary
Gloria Hunniford said she admired Victoria Derbyshire and her video diary "enormously"

TV presenter Gloria Hunniford has praised BBC journalist Victoria Derbyshire for her breast cancer video diary.

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Hunniford lost her daughter Caron Keating in 2004 at the age of 41, after a seven-year battle with breast cancer.

"I admire her enormously," Hunniford said, "I think she's a brave girl doing her video diary, I think it's going to be invaluable to a lot of people watching it.

"I believe she's put forward a very positive message, and that's the message I feel is coming through at the moment - that the drugs are better, people are surviving longer, people are managing it and living with it (breast cancer)."

Derbyshire spoke openly about having a mastectomy following a diagnosis with breast cancer, in an effort to reassure women that having treatment for the condition was "do-able".

Hunniford was speaking ahead of hosting this year's annual PINKTOBER gala, which will raise money for the Caron Keating breast cancer charity.

She described working on the charity as "my healing", saying: "If you weep until the second you die, you're never going to change anything, you're never going to bring her back, so go off and do something positive.

"So, this is me doing something positive...".

Keating, who presented Blue Peter, had two young sons when she passed away.

"As a parent having lost a child, you're still used to being a parent, to going 'there, there' I'll make it better, and you end up totally helpless," she said.

"I would have taken the cancer for her, because she was a young girl ... with two lovely children, it just seemed so grossly unfair ... "

She said having a month like October, which is dedicated to breast cancer awareness was invaluable.

"I do feel the sensation of the figures improving and a more positive attitude settling in, but nevertheless the figures are too high, over 50,000 women die every year of breast cancer.

"But it does highlight the need to know your breasts and know your body."

Press Association

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