Friday 22 September 2017

Davina McCall: I won't have one glass of wine for fear of addiction

Davina McCall and Matthew Robertson pose at Goop's party to launch the summer season, at Mark's Club on May 21, 2013 in London, England. (Photo by David M. Benett/Getty Images)
Davina McCall and Matthew Robertson pose at Goop's party to launch the summer season, at Mark's Club on May 21, 2013 in London, England. (Photo by David M. Benett/Getty Images)

Laura Donnelly

Davina McCall has revealed she will not have one glass of wine for fear she would not be able to stop drinking and still attends Narcotics Anonymous meetings.

The presenter overcame a drug problem when she was in her 20s, but has disclosed that she still attends meetings in London at least once a month.

She said she is also entirely teetotal because her history of heroin abuse meant she was fearful she would not be able to stop drinking, if she had one glass of wine.

The TV presenter said she was not at all tempted to have a drop of alcohol, because she feared addiction.

"If I ever think that wine looks icy cool and fresh on a summer's day, I think , 'But then I'll have another one and another one and another one.' I can't just have one of anything!'

"It sounds dramatic but I've seen it happen to other people. I've got too much to lose and I just don't want to go there," she told the Mirror.

Ms McCall, currently presenting the second series of Channel 4 show The Jump, said that because of her history of drug problems, she took great comfort from talking to others who had faced the same battles, regularly going to Narcotics Anonymous meetings.

"I do still go to meetings because I just think that NA is brilliant - a very, very clever system," she said.

"I've always been really nervous talking about it though, because obviously it's an anonymous thing.

"But it really does work and I've had an awful lot of support from NA over the years. It's sort of a misnomer that people only go when they're about to relapse or they really need help."

The TV presenter said she went to meetings at least once a month, and sometimes more, because she felt "really relaxed there" with others facing the same issues.

"I go because I enjoy it - its one of the places I feel really relaxed, most at home and like I completely fit in," she said. "It's not the Moonies, it's not some weird cult - it's just a place where people get help and support. I get a lot from it."

She also spoke about her husband's grief after the death of his father, just a year after being diagnosed with a brain tumour.

Ms McCall said: "It's been incredibly hard for Matthew who is usually such a happy, upbeat, excitable person. Its been so destroying seeing him so sad. But sometimes life throws you a curve ball and what doesn't break you as a family makes you stronger. As a unit, we are more solid."

Telegraph.co.uk

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