Saturday 22 October 2016

Adele 'was not given formal offer to play at Super Bowl'

Published 16/08/2016 | 03:26

Adele performing at Glastonbury - she said the Super Bowl asked her to play its half-time show
Adele performing at Glastonbury - she said the Super Bowl asked her to play its half-time show

America's National Football League (NFL) has denied Adele was given a "formal offer" to perform at the Super Bowl after she claimed she turned down the chance to sing at the event.

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The British star told an audience at her concert in Los Angeles on Saturday that organisers had asked her to appear during next year's spectacular half-time show but she declined.

The NFL and Pepsi, which sponsor the Super Bowl half-time show, issued a joint statement saying they were "big fans of Adele" but that no artist had been "extended a formal offer".

"We have had conversations with several artists about the Pepsi Super Bowl half-time show," they said. "However, we have not at this point extended a formal offer to Adele or anyone else.

"We are focused on putting together a fantastic show for Houston and we look forward to revealing that in good time."

Earlier this year Super Bowl 50 became the third most watched broadcast in American television history with an average of 111.9 million viewers, according to Nielsen.

The US TV audience reportedly peaked during the half-time show when an average of 115.5 million people tuned in to watch Coldplay, Beyonce and Bruno Mars perform.

In a video posted online over the weekend, Adele told audience members at her LA concert that she rejected the chance to perform at next February's event because it was "not about music".

"First of all, I'd like to tell you I'm not doing the Super Bowl," she said. "I mean, come on, that show is not about music ... I don't dance or anything like that.

"They were very kind, they did ask me, but I did say no."

"I'm sorry, but maybe next time," she added.

Madonna, the Rolling Stones and Prince are among the artists who have previously performed at the Super Bowl.

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