Tuesday 27 June 2017

Shoot-out revamp top of proposed rule changes

The proposed change to mirror the switch of serve between opponents in the tie-break system used in tennis follows research that shows the side who take the first kick in a shoot-out win 60pc of the time. Stock image
The proposed change to mirror the switch of serve between opponents in the tie-break system used in tennis follows research that shows the side who take the first kick in a shoot-out win 60pc of the time. Stock image

Ben Rumsby

Penalty shoot-outs could soon resemble tennis tie-breaks, under plans to change the order in which opponents take their kicks.

Tests will be conducted this year in which the team who go first in a shoot-out will then have to wait two more turns to take their next kick, in what football's lawmakers are describing as an 'ABBA' sequence.

The proposed change to mirror the switch of serve between opponents in the tie-break system used in tennis follows research that shows the side who take the first kick in a shoot-out win 60pc of the time.

The plan was announced following yesterday's annual general meeting of the International Football Association Board at Wembley.

In another change agreed, teams will be allowed to make a fourth substitution in extra-time, while players will no longer automatically be shown a yellow card for 'stopping a promising attack' in the penalty area.

Confirmed

It was also all but confirmed that Video Assistant Referees (VAR) will be used in next season's FA Cup from the third round onwards.

FIFA president Gianni Infantino had already announced plans to use VARs at this summer's Confederations Cup in Russia ahead of a proposed ratification of the concept next year.

The Premier League, who are conducting non-live VAR trials this season, have refused to conduct live tests next term.

A big focus of the meeting was improving player behaviour, with plans announced to prevent anyone but the captain speaking to the referee following a major incident.

Football's global rule-making unanimously backed a plan to allow countries to introduce extra substitutes, sin-bins and varying match durations to grassroots and youth football.

However, the 'modifications' will not apply in the top divisions or senior internationals.

For historic reasons, the IFAB is made up of the football associations of England, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Wales, and four representatives from FIFA to represent the rest of the game. Each association gets one vote, and a three-quarters majority is needed to make a change.

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