Friday 29 July 2016

FA tighten up rules on head injuries

Jamie Holland

Published 06/08/2014 | 02:30

Tottenham goalkeeper Hugo Lloris played on despite being concussed in a game against Everton last season. Photo: Chris Brunskill/Getty Images
Tottenham goalkeeper Hugo Lloris played on despite being concussed in a game against Everton last season. Photo: Chris Brunskill/Getty Images

Tougher new rules on dealing with head injuries have been announced for the new season after a number of controversies surrounding players staying on the pitch despite having suffered from concussion.

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Players and managers in the Premier League will be told the doctor's decision is final – even if the injured player wants to play on.

Meanwhile, players who are even suspected of losing consciousness during a match will have to be removed from the game and not allowed to return, under new rules announced by the English FA.

It comes after a number of concussion controversies last season – Tottenham 'keeper Hugo Lloris and Everton striker Romelu Lukaku both appeared to play on despite being concussed in separate incidents.

In the World Cup, Alvaro Pereira of Uruguay insisted on playing on after being knocked out in a collision with England's Raheem Sterling.

New Premier League rules state: "When a serious head injury is suffered on the pitch (in matches or training) the ruling of the doctor/medical practitioner is final."

There is also a new requirement for all Premier League matches to include a 'tunnel doctor', who will support the team doctors in recognising the signs of concussion.

It will be mandatory for all Premier League medical staff to carry the 'concussion recognition tool'. The new FA guidelines state: "If there has been a confirmed or suspected period of loss of consciousness, the player must be removed from the field of play, and not be allowed to return.

"If here is any doubt as to the course of events, elucidation may be sought from officials or other players. In the event that there is video replay available pitch-side or in the players' tunnel, this could be used to clarify the course of events.

"Where no loss of consciousness is apparent an on-field or touchline assessment will take place."

A campaign on head injury treatment, supported by the Premier League, Football League and LMA, will be accompanied by an education programme in conjunction with the Professional Footballers' Association.

Arsenal FC doctor Gary O'Driscoll, a first cousin of Brian and chairman of the Premier League doctors' group, said: "There has been a perception in the past that you can tough it out, you can play on. We need to make sure that everybody is aware of concussion and understands it's just as significant as any other injury and appropriate management is critical."

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