Thursday 29 September 2016

Revamped Dalymount Park set to have artificial playing pitch

Soccer

Published 07/07/2015 | 02:30

Speaking on behalf of the FAI, League of Ireland director Fran Gavin admitted that talks were ongoing but it looked likely that a synthetic pitch will be installed at the new stadium (Sportsfile)
Speaking on behalf of the FAI, League of Ireland director Fran Gavin admitted that talks were ongoing but it looked likely that a synthetic pitch will be installed at the new stadium (Sportsfile)

The playing surface at Dalymount Park is likely to be artificial once the redevelopment has been completed by Dublin City Council.

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Bohemians announced last week that they had sold their home to DCC for €3.8 million but the stadium will be maintained and revamped.

It is expected that Dalymount Park will be used as a base for a country competing at the 2020 European Championships but concerns are now sure to arise over whether or not teams would be willing to train on the artificial surface.

Speaking on behalf of the FAI, League of Ireland director Fran Gavin admitted that talks were ongoing but it looked likely that a synthetic pitch will be installed at the new stadium.

"That's something that will have to be discussed. It's all on the table at the moment," Gavin said.

Improved

"It seems to be the thing. I saw a stat that said in 10 years' time, most underage kids will have learned to play football on a plastic pitch as we'd call it.

"Technology has improved immensely. The women's World Cup has just finished and that was all on plastic pitches so it's the way of the future.

"From an economical point of view, I suppose it makes sense. The thing that we've learned is that those (plastic) pitches do take as much maintenance if not more than a natural pitch.

"That needs to be taken into consideration when discussing the economic model of a club. I'm sure those talks will continue."

DCC project manager of Dalymount Park Cormac Healy commented: "We'll be liaising very closely with the FAI and getting their expert input on what the requirements are with that (surface) in mind."

Gavin also welcomed the decision to possibly have Shelbourne involved, should they eventually decide to ground-share.

"Facility-sharing is common practice in Europe - the biggest clubs in the world do it," Gavin added.

"There's no reason why we can't do it here in Dublin."

Irish Independent

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