Sunday 25 June 2017

Video: Five memorable meetings between Ireland and England

Republic of Ireland's Charlie O'Leary, left and Ray Houghton celebrate after defeating England.
Republic of Ireland's Charlie O'Leary, left and Ray Houghton celebrate after defeating England.

Ireland take on England in a historic game at the Aviva Stadium on Sunday. Here are five of the most memorable meetings between the sides.

SEPTEMBER 30, 1946

Republic of Ireland 0

England 1

Just over a year after World War II had come to an end, England and Ireland met for the first time in front of 32,000 at Dalymount Park. Tom Finney scored England's goal eight minutes from time.

JUNE 12, 1988

England 0

Republic of Ireland 1

Ray Houghton gave the Republic a shock win in their first appearance at a major international tournament as Bobby Robson's Euro '88 campaign got off to the worst possible start. Kenny Sansom failed to clear Tony Galvin's cross properly and the ball ballooned up to John Aldridge, who headed it to Houghton, and he nodded past Peter Shilton to give the Irish a famous win in Stuttgart.

NOVEMBER 14, 1990

Republic of Ireland 1

England 1

A sign of what was to come five years later. Over 100 people were arrested as England and Ireland fans clashed in Dublin after the game. On the pitch, David Platt tapped in Lee Dixon's cross to put England ahead, but substitute Tony Cascarino headed past Chris Woods to equalise before being mobbed by ecstatic home fans who ran on to the pitch at Lansdowne Road.

MARCH 27, 1991

England 1

Republic of Ireland 1

Lee Dixon was hardly known for his scoring prowess, but he did bag a crucial goal – his only international strike – to put England ahead after nine minutes in the Euro '92 qualifier at Wembley. Niall Quinn equalised just before half-time, though, and a dominant Ireland should have won.

FEBRUARY 15, 1995

Republic of Ireland 1

England 0

(Match abandoned due to crowd trouble)

The most memorable match between the two nations – but for all the wrong reasons. The Lansdowne Road game had to be abandoned after 27 minutes when England fans in the upper west stand, annoyed at seeing their team go 1-0 down to David Kelly's strike, started ripping up seats before hurling them at home supporters below. Twenty supporters were injured in the incident, which is still regarded by many as the darkest night for English football. It later emerged that far-right groups such as Combat 18 had bought tickets for the match to cause trouble. Ireland manager Jack Charlton could not hide his fury, saying: "Every Englishman should be ashamed." England counterpart Terry Venables described the night as "sickening."

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