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Leinster were the 'cappuccino-sipping ‘Dublin 4’ types’ of rugby - Cheika

Published 08/03/2014 | 12:35

Cheika, who replaced Declan Kidney as head coach of Leinster in May 2005, said the stereotype was due to ‘poor performances in the past’.
Cheika, who replaced Declan Kidney as head coach of Leinster in May 2005, said the stereotype was due to ‘poor performances in the past’.

Leinster were once known as the ‘cappuccino-sipping ‘Dublin 4’ types’ of rugby, coach Michael Cheika has said of his former team.

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Cheika, who replaced Declan Kidney as head coach of Leinster in May 2005, said the stereotype was due to ‘poor performances in the past’.

The coach spoke to The Sydney Morning Herald in an article that described the players as the ‘ladyboys’ of the sport.

"It was due to poor performances in the past and not just on the field," Cheika told the newspaper.

"We had the wrong stereotype. In Leinster we were the cappuccino-sipping 'Dublin 4' types."

Cheika, who was virtually unknown at the time, said he set about changing that but admitted he was short on experience.

Waratahs head coach Michael Cheika during training Picture credit: Stephen McCarthy / SPORTSFILE
Waratahs head coach Michael Cheika during training Picture credit: Stephen McCarthy / SPORTSFILE

"I didn't really know what I was doing in year one at Leinster, to be honest," he says. "I was just seeing what happened. Now I have more experience."

The coach was quoted in the Sydney Morning Herald about his plans for the Waratahs.

The article reads: ‘In contrast to the brand of honest, tough rugby played down south by their arch rivals Munster, Leinster were known as the "ladyboys" of Irish rugby.’

Cheika is one season into an ambitious attempt to change rugby in New South Wales and said it’s ‘going in the right direction’.

"The biggest thing for me is the attitude of the players and that we're really starting to show our values on a day-to-day basis,” he said of his current team.

“Off the field, on the field, and building a really nice football club atmosphere. The peripheral stuff is out of our mind - all the excuses - we're just concentrating on the job that they need to do."

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