Tuesday 27 September 2016

Kenyan coach sent home for posing as athlete and giving a urine sample

Gordon Raynor

Published 12/08/2016 | 02:30

Kenya’s participation in the Olympics had been in doubt after 40 of
its athletes failed drug tests over the past four years. Photo: Getty Images
Kenya’s participation in the Olympics had been in doubt after 40 of its athletes failed drug tests over the past four years. Photo: Getty Images

Rio 2016 was hit by the biggest scandal of the Games last night - after a Kenyan official was sent home for posing as an athlete and giving a urine sample.

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John Anzrah, coach of the sprint team, was expelled by his own country after he signed documents claiming he was a competitor at the Olympics.

According to the 'Nairobi Citizen', Anzrah was wearing the accreditation badge of Ferguson Rotich, a Kenyan 800m runner.

Anzrah was also coach to the African members of Team Refugee, the 10-member squad competing under the Olympic flag.

It comes two days after Michael Rotich, manager of the Kenyan athletics team, was arrested after being sent home following allegations in the 'Sunday Times' that he asked for £10,000 bribes to give advance warning of tests.

Anzrah, a former athlete, became the second official from his nation to be expelled from Rio after doping control officers allegedly discovered his face did not match the photograph on his accreditation.

Kip Keino, chairman of the Kenyan Olympic Committee, said: "We have sent Anzrah back home. He presented himself as an athlete, gave the urine sample and even signed the documents. We cannot tolerate such behaviour."

A source told the 'Nairobi Citizen' that Anzrah "took possession of an identity card (accreditation) of an athlete who was in the list of Wada [World Anti-Doping Agency] for out-of-competition dope testing and went to the dining hall.

"He was picked and taken to the doping control station purportedly as Ferguson Rotich and subjected to produce the sample and he signed."

Tests

The source said "it was wrong for him to produce [the] sample" and "[sign] samples as Ferguson Rotich".

Kenya's participation in the Olympics had been in doubt after 40 of its athletes failed drugs tests over the past four years.

In April, the country's president passed a law making doping in sport a criminal offence, to satisfy Wada and save Kenya's place at Rio.

A Kenyan magistrate this week ruled that Michael Rotich could be held by police for four weeks during an investigation into the claims he was prepared to warn coaches about doping controls for cash.

He denies any wrongdoing, saying he only went along with the scheme because he wanted to find out who the undercover reporters were and "protect" athletes. (© Daily Telegraph, London)

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