Saturday 3 December 2016

Tennis fan suspected of illegal betting ejected from Auckland Open

Published 11/01/2012 | 14:58

THE Tennis Integrity Unit has launched an investigation after a spectator, suspected of illegal betting, was ejected from the Heineken Open tournament in Auckland.

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A local radio station reported that the New Zealand man was seen using a handheld device, possibly to bet on specific points and take advantage of the delay of several seconds before other gamblers saw the points played on television.

At last week’s women’s tournament at the same venue, a Spanish man who reportedly had been previously ejected from Wimbledon, was asked to leave the event.

Radio Sports said more than 2,500 New Zealand dollars (£1,280) in tickets to the tournament were purchased in London, an unusually large amount.

ATP Tour supervisor Tom Barnes said illegal betting, using the time lag that occurred with internet scoring or live television, was a common problem and officials were trained to watch for spectators possibly transmitting information.

“(They use) a laptop or a cell phone - these people are very crafty,” Barnes told the New Zealand Herald. “On some of these European betting sites, you can bet for example on a first serve and whether a guy is going to make a fault or not.

A local radio station reported that the New Zealand man was seen using a handheld device, possibly to bet on specific points and take advantage of the delay of several seconds before other gamblers saw the points played on television.

At last week’s women’s tournament at the same venue, a Spanish man who reportedly had been previously ejected from Wimbledon, was asked to leave the event.

Radio Sports said more than 2,500 New Zealand dollars (£1,280) in tickets to the tournament were purchased in London, an unusually large amount.

ATP Tour supervisor Tom Barnes said illegal betting, using the time lag that occurred with internet scoring or live television, was a common problem and officials were trained to watch for spectators possibly transmitting information.

“(They use) a laptop or a cell phone - these people are very crafty,” Barnes told the New Zealand Herald. “On some of these European betting sites, you can bet for example on a first serve and whether a guy is going to make a fault or not.

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