Saturday 1 October 2016

Mark English and Thomas Barr seal places in World Championship semi-finals

Cathal Dennehy

Published 22/08/2015 | 10:16

Thomas Barr in action during the heats of the Men's 400m hurdles event. IAAF World Athletics Championships Beijing 2015 - Day 1, National Stadium, Beijing, China. Picture credit: Stephen McCarthy / SPORTSFILE
Thomas Barr in action during the heats of the Men's 400m hurdles event. IAAF World Athletics Championships Beijing 2015 - Day 1, National Stadium, Beijing, China. Picture credit: Stephen McCarthy / SPORTSFILE
Mark English watches the remaining heats after competing in the heats of the Men's 800m event where he finished in 5th place and qualified for the next round.

Mark English and Thomas Barr both successfully navigated through their qualifying heats on the first day of the IAAF World Championships in Beijing today..

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As a result, Barr and English will now line up in the semi-finals of their respective events – 400m hurdles and 800m – tomorrow and when they enter the cauldron that is the Bird’s Nest Stadium, each of them will face the most daunting challenge of their career to date.

English finished fifth in his 800m heat in 1:46.69, which was fast enough to qualify the 22-year-old as one of the six fastest losers.  “I was very nervous,” he said of his 20-minute wait trackside watching the remaining heats before he was confirmed as one of the qualifiers. “It’s nerve-wracking; it’s your whole year on the line in those few moments, but I’m delighted to have made it through.”

English positioned himself in third throughout the opening lap as Colombia’s Rafith Rodriguez took the field through the opening lap in a steady 52.52 seconds. “My plan today was to sit in second or third and be involved with 300m to go,” he said. “If you sit any further back it’s so hard to make a move, so I said I’ll let them come at me.”

Mark English watches the remaining heats after competing in the heats of the Men's 800m event where he finished in 5th place and qualified for the next round.
Mark English watches the remaining heats after competing in the heats of the Men's 800m event where he finished in 5th place and qualified for the next round.

The Donegal athlete stayed nestled on the inside until he entered the home straight, but English soon found himself running out of gas on the frantic dash to the line. In the end, his time proved enough to see him through, and he will take his place in the third of three semi-finals at 1:31pm Irish time tomorrow.

“I wasn’t friends with anybody in that call-up room,” he said. “I was mentally focused on that race, ready for it, so I’m just moving on now. It’s my first semi-final at a world championships so I’m going to go out and enjoy it. I’m racing guys I’m used to racing tomorrow and I’ve beaten them before, so I’ll be pretty confident.

“In the semi I’ll have to run close to a PB. It’ll probably take a 1:44-high or a 1:45-low to make the final. They’re all going to be fast, and that’s the sort of race that’ll suit me.”

Barr, meanwhile, secured a more straightforward passage to today’s semi-finals, finishing third in his heat in his qualifying heat in 49.20 seconds. Running relatively blind on the outside lane, Barr was overtaken by Turkey’s Yasmani Copello after a conservative first 150m. “I was running my own race out there, so it was tough to gauge,” said Barr. “Hopefully it might be an inside lane tomorrow.”

The Ferrybank athlete turned into the home straight in fifth position but produced his typically powerful finishing burst to move up over the final 50m to qualify automatically in third. “I had to do so much work down the home straight but I’m glad I had that kick,” said Barr.

“I felt good. This is my first world championships and I’ve made it to the semi-final, but there were parts of that race I wasn’t happy about and I know my coach will have noticed too. I’m glad I have something to work on for tomorrow.

“Considering what was run today, I think it’s going to take low-48 to make the final. I’m going to have to run the race of my life. If it all comes together, I could be in the final.”

On the international front, meanwhile, all eyes will be trained on the men’s 100m final tomorrow, with Usain Bolt hoping to fend off the challenge of Justin Gatlin and defend his world title at 2:15pm Irish time.

Gatlin breezed through his qualifying heat yesterday in 9.83 seconds, while Bolt was equally relaxed – if not quite as swift – when winning comfortably in 9.97.

With Gatlin unbeaten for almost two years and having been imperious in the sprint ranks this season, the task facing Bolt in deposing him is a considerable one.

In Gatlin – who is running faster than ever at the age of 33 having served two doping bans – Bolt now has a rival who he will need to be at his best, or at least very close to it, to defeat.

With Gatlin being despised by many in athletics – while merely tolerated by others – and Bolt viewed as the apparent saviour of the sport, the clash will be lent the inevitable narrative of a clichéd movie script.

For those wishing for a Bolt victory, though – and for those hoping for a bright new dawn to help forget sprinting’s dark past – there is unlikely to be a Hollywood ending.

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