Tuesday 28 March 2017

Have your say: Ó Sé's views way off mark

I must put pen to paper to say how disgusted I feel after reading Páidí Ó Sé's column [Sept 12]. He states that the occasion got to Kilkenny, they were nervous and if the game was played the following day, they would have won. What rubbish from this man.

Mr Ó Sé, Kilkenny were outhurled, outrun and beaten by a great Tipperary team, who timed their peak to perfection by a great manager. With a bit of luck, Kilkenny would be only three-in-a-row winners, not four, if Tipp had got the rub of the green last year and a ref doing his job.

Tipp have won finals in every decade for over 100 years, going back to my relatives in the first team in 1887. They have never lost two finals in a row to Kilkenny and could beat them Sunday or Monday. Stick with pulling pints Mr Ó Sé and leave the writing to those who know what they are talking about.

JJ Ryan

Offaly deserve more credit

Did I detect a note of begrud-gery in Páidí ó Sé's article in last week's Sunday Independent regarding the 1982 final? If so, this is very disappointing considering the normally magnanimous spirit of the Kerry people. Can I say to Páidí -- get over it.

Brendan Glennon

Bogged down buying tickets

I read with interest about the FAI's worries regarding the sale of tickets and I was drawn to a photo showing thousands of empty seats just prior to kick-off [v Andorra].

I sent an email to the FAI on August 28 requesting info on the non-availability of certain tickets on Ticketmaster. It was my intention to purchase seven tickets seated in a row for the East or West stand but I was unable to do so. I received a return email a very speedy three days later informing me that my request was sent to the relevant department.

Since that was the last I heard from the FAI, I presumed the match must have been a sell-out and the thousands of empty seats shown in the picture must have been taken while the fans were in the toilet . . . just like the FAI.

Larry Ryan

Not a long way to Tipperary

I refer to an article published by Tommy Conlon in your newspaper on August 22.

In the article Mr Conlon refers to the long road back to the home of hurling in a rather disparaging if not somewhat tongue in cheek article on Tipperary hurling.

Let me assure Mr Conlon and your readers that far from being a long road home it has been a short and most enjoyable road home to the Premier County over the last two weekends as the county has celebrated collecting two All-Ireland hurling titles.

Colm Purcell

McIlroy gives us a big boost

We are in the most of negative of times. But there are moments of achievement of such a good nature that we can't stay cynical for long in the face of it. An example of this is that of the 21-year-old Irish golfer, Rory McIlory, who won his first US PGA tour event this summer.

He broke the course record by two, his final day score was 10-under and overall he was 15-under, which is a phenomenal result in any golfing tournament. He has been on the professional circuit for over two years, winning the Dubai Classic and even Tiger Woods said recently that he didn't play as well as Rory did at the age of 18, when he could hit the strongest of drives.

He seems down to earth, very mature for his age, gracious and respectful of opponents and the media. He is enjoying, what is for him, a great way of earning a lucrative living. He is also on this year's European Ryder Cup team for the first time, facing the USA Team at Celtic Manor in Wales in a few weeks.

His popularity is shown by the reaction of one little girl who was waiting to see him perform at one of the championships in the USA, sitting on her dad's shoulders, she called out "Oh look, there's Rory . . . Rory!" she called over to him and unlike the great Tiger Woods, who before his spectacular fall from grace last year had become very standoffish from his fans, Rory has a likeability factor and appreciation of support from young and old alike.

Mary Sullivan

Sunday Independent

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