Sunday 11 December 2016

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Published 15/08/2010 | 05:00

Páidí's whingeing strikes sour note

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The football championship is wide open, fans up and down the country are looking forward to novel semi-finals pairings . . . except for Páidí ó Sé.

Last week Páidí suggested that Jack O'Connor partakes in too much whingeing; maybe he should read his own article before giving out advice.

Two months after the Munster semi-final replay, Páidí is still whingeing about the suspension handed out to Paul Galvin. He reckons the GAA are out to get Kerry, hence the subsequent suspension given to Tomás ó Sé after the Munster final and he even alleged that Killian Young's disallowed goal against Down was another example of the GAA's anti-Kerry agenda.

While the CCCC system is without doubt flawed, with some players getting suspended and others not, Galvin and ó Sé committed acts deemed illegal on a GAA pitch and therefore served their punishment. The duo themselves appear to have a lot more grace and humility than Páidí.

He also says that Kerry have been the only county subject to the CCCC reversing a decision -- others though have suffered the same fate including Dermot Molloy (Donegal), David Whyte (Kildare) and Brian O'Meara (Tipperary).

I, for one, and I'm sure there are plenty of similar opinion, were delighted to see Kerry defeated; and such comments by an all-time great only re-enforces that view.

Cathal MacSuibhne

Irish 'supporters' are anything but

Having recently attended the first soccer match at the Aviva Stadium between a League of Ireland selection and Manchester United, I would like to make a few comments.

As far as I could see, 99% of the crowd were Irish yet they chose to support a team representing the English Premier League against a team representing the League of Ireland. These are the so-called best football supporters in the world. What a joke.

The obsession of RTE with all things Premiership has the people brainwashed. English football was shown up for what it is at the recent World Cup. God be with the days when Irish fans supported their own.

Can you imagine a Spanish, German or Italian crowd supporting a foreign team against one of their own? I think not. The whole thing made me ashamed to be Irish.

Brian Murray

Only way is up for new Lansdowne

The pitiful, pathetic two opening events to be held in the Aviva Stadium reached such a nadir in quality entertainment that what follows can only be vast improvement.

Eamonn Sweeney's views [August 8] on the first soccer match were therefore very apt and accurate.

Gerry Daly

Fans pay price of GAA profiteering

The Dubs, having qualified for one of this year's All-Ireland senior football semi-finals against the rebels of Cork, have brought a renewed vigorous interest and optimistic anticipation to Gaelic football in Dublin.

The win over 2008 All-Ireland champions Tyrone has brought expectations of Sam returning to Dublin for the first time since 1995. Indeed, one championship success in the last 24 years is a drought by Dublin's standards and tells its own story.

Like many success-starved Dubs' fans, as soon as tickets were for sale I went online to purchase. Apart from standing tickets on The Hill which cost €30, all seating accommodation costs €45 each. The GAA flourishes because it places community above selfish demands.

Central Council should not lose sight of the fact that it is volunteer participation which makes the GAA the success that it is. The €45 cost of a ticket, in addition to travel costs for some, will put this match out of reach of many volunteer participants. This commercialisation is anathema to the founding principles of the GAA.

In addition to these costs, Ticketmaster charge €4.50 per ticket purchased. I bought five tickets over the internet and had to pay a charge of €22.50 to Ticketmaster for a single online transaction. This has all the hallmarks of profiteering.

Why does the GAA employ a third party to sell its tickets thereby creating another level of bureaucracy? Can Ticketmaster justify this seemingly exorbitant charge? Can the GAA justify its own Pontius Pilate stance on this issue?

Tom Cooper

Sunday Independent

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