Sport Cycling

Wednesday 17 September 2014

Lance Armstrong gives seven-hour doping evidence

Disgraced American cyclist's lawyer reveals he met the Cycling Independent Reform Commission for seven hours in Washington in May

Published 18/07/2014 | 13:36

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Spilling the beans: Lance Armstrong has given evidence to investigators
Spilling the beans: Lance Armstrong has given evidence to investigators

Lance Armstrong has talked with investigators and given evidence about doping in cycling's past, revealed his lawyer Elliot Peters.

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The 42-year-old met the Cycling Independent Reform Commission for seven hours in Washington in May.

"It was a very good meeting," said Peters. "If you made a list of all the questions people would want to ask about Lance and his activities in cycling and everything else, those were the questions that were asked and answered."

Armstrong's willingness to meet with investigators is crucial in their efforts to determine whether former officials within the sport's governing body (UCI) aided his doping.

The CIRC was established by Brian Cookson after he became UCI president in September last year, replacing Pat McQuaid, and among other things it will address the governing body's role in the US Postal scandal.

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Travis Tygart, head of the United States Anti-Doping Agency (Usada), has said that Armstrong's lifetime ban for doping could be reduced if he provides information which assists investigations.

However, Peters as insisted that Armstrong did not ask for, and was not offered, any deal in exchange for the meeting.

"There is no agreement and that was never discussed. We never asked for one," Peters said. "We do think the ban was unfairly harsh and should be reduced.

"He's [Armstrong] talking in the spirit of not trying to benefit by getting somebody else in trouble, but in the spirit of 'let's tell the truth'."

Armstrong was stripped of his seven Tour de France titles from 1999 to 2005 and handed a lifetime ban over his use of performance-enhancing drugs in 2012.

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