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Saturday 3 December 2016

Tyson Fury apologises after latest homophobic, sexist and anti-Semitic rant

Mark Staniforth

Published 17/05/2016 | 07:28

Tyson Fury
Tyson Fury

Tyson Fury has promised to live up to his responsibilities as an ambassador for British boxing after apologising for his latest offensive rant made in an hour-long video interview last week.

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Fury issued a public apology on Monday following his latest bout of homophobic, sexist and anti-Semitic comments which prompted the Campaign for Anti-Semitism to demand he be banned from the sport.

And he vowed to do his best to bite his tongue in the build-up to his world heavyweight title rematch against Wladimir Klitschko in Manchester on July 9.

Fury said in a statement: "I apologise to anyone who may have taken offence at any of my comments.

"I said some things, which may have hurt some people, which as a Christian man is not something I would ever want to do.

"Though it is not an excuse, sometimes the heightened media scrutiny has caused me to act out in public. I mean no harm or disrespect to anyone and I know more is expected of me as an ambassador of British boxing and I promise in future to hold myself up to the highest possible standard.

"Anyone who knows me personally knows that I am in no way a racist or bigot and I hope the public accept this apology."

In a 57-minute video interview which was posted on YouTube, Fury claimed: "Zionist, Jewish people ... own all the banks, all the papers, all the TV stations", as well as repeating extreme views on bestiality, paedophilia and the role of women.

The British Boxing Board of Control is yet to comment on Fury's latest outburst, having issued a statement reminding him of his responsibilities after previous controversial comments in December.

The statement issued on Fury's behalf maintained his comments had been misinterpreted.

It added: "As a man of Traveller heritage, Mr Fury has suffered bigotry and racial abuse throughout his life and as such would never wish anyone to suffer the same. He has many friends of a wide range of backgrounds and races and wishes no ill to anyone of any race, religion or sexual orientation."

Press Association

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