Thursday 27 April 2017

Eubank insists his son is worth the outlay

Chris Eubank Jr Photo: Getty
Chris Eubank Jr Photo: Getty

Gareth A Davies

The swagger of Chris Eubank Snr has passed on effortlessly to his son and namesake, who challenges for his first world title against Australian Renold Quinlan at Olympia tonight.

Derision from inside the industry has greeted the latest version of The Eubank Show, given that it is a pay per view event, on ITV Box Office.

The criticism is because Quinlan is not in Eubank's class. Yet Eubank Snr baulks at being called a callous opportunist in a cut-throat sport.

"We have a clear path," explained Eubank. "We don't have people interfering as promoters do. Now they are out of the way because there is a huge organisation (ITV) who see us as the conduit to giving the public what they want to see. So they are going to protect us like we are gold, like diamonds."

This is the precursor to major fight nights ahead. The IBO super-middleweight crown is just a 'test event'.

Plotted

Bigger nights ahead, fights with middleweight No 1 Gennady Golovkin, super-middleweight James DeGale, or even American lynchpin at light-heavyweight Andre Ward are being plotted for by boxer, father and television executives.

"He can cook them all, Golvkin, Ward, all of them, believe me," said Eubank Snr. "I didn't want him to box, I tried all I could to dissuade him, but at every step he proved to me he has it.

"This is my son, my flesh and blood, and I have no fear for him against any of these other elite fighters."

Former undisputed world heavyweight champion Lennox Lewis explained the fascination the public holds for Eubank. Just as there is for Lewis.

"We are names who were there for a while and we had great fight night and we are in the hearts of the British people," he said.

Eubank will almost certainly claim the little-regarded IBO 12st crown tonight, emphatically, most likely viciously, but it is what happens after this with the pay per view experiment that will be telling.

Right now, punters must pay to see the names in boxing. At least when they are called Eubank.

Telegraph.co.uk

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