Saturday 10 December 2016

After four hours of pure hell, Ben claims Ironman crown

Published 15/08/2016 | 02:30

Ben Collins of the USA wins the Ironman 70.3 competition in Dublin yesterday. Photo: David Fitzgerald/Sportsfile
Ben Collins of the USA wins the Ironman 70.3 competition in Dublin yesterday. Photo: David Fitzgerald/Sportsfile

They battled through the pain barrier and pushed their bodies to the limit for hours, but in the end there could be only one winner.

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American triathlete Ben Collins claimed victory at Dublin's second annual Ironman 70.3 event yesterday.

A bloodied competitor smiles as he completes the Ironman 70.3 triathlon. Photo: Charles McQuillan/Getty Images
A bloodied competitor smiles as he completes the Ironman 70.3 triathlon. Photo: Charles McQuillan/Getty Images

Collins completed the 1.2km swim, 90km cycling loop and 21.1km run in a time of four hours and 41 seconds.

The event kicked off with the swim at 6.50am at Scotsman's Bay, in Dún Laoghaire and ended in the Phoenix Park.

Hundreds of people gathered at the finish line to welcome the exhausted athletes home.

Collins celebrated his win with a well deserved drink of beer from a giant glass.

More than 2,000 competitors took part in the race, including some famous faces.

TV3 weather man Deric Hartigan, former Irish contestant on the 'Biggest Loser UK' show Gerard Burke and personal trainer and fitness columnist Karl Henry all took part.

The fastest Irishman was former Leeds United footballer turned cyclist Bryan McCrystal.

He finished the event in a time of four hours and 56 seconds, making him second overall, just 15 seconds behind the leader.

For the women, Aileen Flynn was the fastest of the Irish to cross the line with a time of four hours and 41 minutes. British woman Susie Cheetham took the title of fastest woman to complete the race. She finished with a time of four hours and 22 minutes.

Landon Cassill, a well-known Nascar racer from the US, had made the journey to compete in the race.

He finished in a time of five hours and two minutes.

He narrowly beat his father Roger, who finished the race a time of in five hours and six minutes.

Irish Independent

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