Monday 23 October 2017

Greatness of hurling will never be lost in translation

Waterford's Maurice Shanahan celebrates after scoring his side's first goal against Cork on Sunday
Waterford's Maurice Shanahan celebrates after scoring his side's first goal against Cork on Sunday

Donny Mahoney

And so our English cousins have come and gone without much fuss. Pints were drank, Big Jack was cheered, a pointless match played, and hopefully everyone watched the hurling afterwards.

I encountered a few guys from Surrey or Coventry watching Cork-Waterford in a pub off Stephen's Green. They were awestruck.

They were sitting beside a few Corkonians. It was a black day for those lads. As if watching their county being out-thought and outfought by the Déise wasn't bad enough, they had to translate the game for these blokes from Blighty.

There was one frenetic passage of play in the second half that had the English guys delirious. Maurice Shanahan fought through a forest of shoulders before kicking the sliotar and attempting a shot.

"He kicked it! He kicked the ball!" they all shouted.

Listening to these orgasmic shrieks of these English guys on Sunday made appreciate that hurling is the one of maybe three good things that Ireland has given the world. Surely the time is now for missionaries to set off with ash to the four corners of the globe. "Imagine what the Brazilians could do with hurling," I think Joe said a few weeks back.

Seconded.

Irish Independent

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