Sport Hurling

Tuesday 30 September 2014

Cody backs Kilkenny legend Keher's campaign to abandon use of cards

Published 11/02/2014 | 02:30

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Kilkenny manager Brian Cody
Kilkenny manager Brian Cody

Kilkenny hurling manager Brian Cody has backed a move to abandon the use of cards in Gaelic games and return to the old system of cautioning or booking players who commit acts of dangerous play before sending them off for a second offence.

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Cody has urged support for a document put together by Kilkenny legend Eddie Keher which has been submitted to Croke Park calling for the abolition of cards which Keher believes promote cynicism and the feigning of injury among hurlers.

Cody was reflecting on the rescinding by the Central Hearings Committee of Henry Shefflin's red card in last year's All-Ireland hurling quarter-final defeat to Cork.

He stressed it was important that Shefflin pursued the matter as it could have had ramifications for him if he picked up two yellow cards again in 2014.

"It was obvious to me straight away that it was incorrect and it was only right then that the incorrect call was challenged. The powers that be upheld that challenge and it was cleared," said Cody.

Cody believes the rescinding of the red card for Shefflin and for Cork's Pat Horgan in the Munster final is symptomatic of what he fears is an "over-emphasis on cards."

"The ones that were rescinded obviously were wrong, to be applied there. I suppose it's well-known what I feel about all that aspect of things. I think that there is absolutely an over-emphasis on cards, without a shadow of a doubt.

"I don't want to start getting into a whole rigmarole again talking about how matches are refereed, or whatever it is but it can't become a non-contact sport, and there's an absolute emphasis on heading in that direction."

Cody believes Keher's submission before Christmas offers a solution to his fears.

"He wouldn't be bringing forward something that would be detrimental to the game and he was a stylist of the game.

"He wasn't what you would call a physical player who was involved in skirmishes.

"He was an elegant, stylish player, so his thoughts would be worth listening to, I would think."

Irish Independent

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