Sport Golf

Sunday 30 April 2017

Watch - Tiger Woods accepts he will never be fully fit again in a brutally honest interview

Tiger Woods
Tiger Woods
Kevin Palmer

Kevin Palmer

Tiger Woods has admitted he may ‘never feel great again’ and admits he considered quitting the sport on numerous occasions as he has battled injuries and personal issues in recent years.

In his most candid interview since his latest comeback attempt, Woods accepts he faces a huge challenge to get in the mix to add to his 14 major titles wins as he tries to get his game into shape ahead of the Masters in Augusta in April.

“It’s been tough and at times it’s been brutal,” said Woods reflecting on his recovery from knee and back injuries.

“There were times when I physically didn’t know if I could get out of bed. And there were times I needed help just to get out of bed.

“It was one of the hardest things to wrap my head around, but I had a lot of great people around me to help me and keep my spirits up. The two most important people to me in my life kept my spirits up every day and that is my kids.

“There have been plenty of times when I thought I would never play the game (again) at elite level. You put in the leg work, got to get in the gym, got to hit balls. You’ve got to refine your game and not make dumb mistakes out there on the golf course.

“In order to do that you’ve got to play a lot and I couldn’t play. Playing once every three or four weeks is not going to cut it and there were a lot of times where I didn’t think I was going to make it back.”

Assessing his current fitness levels, Woods claims he has to come to terms with the reality that he may never be fully fit again after back and knee operations.

“I feel good, but not great,” he added. “Granted, I don’t think I’ll ever feel great because it’s three back surgeries, four knee operations.

“I am always going to be a little bit sore, it’s just the way it is. But as long as I can function and function at a good enough level then I’m fine with that.”

“The whole plan was to get my body, mind and spirit ready for that first full week in April. You know, I’ve done it four times (Masters wins) and I’d love to do it a fifth.

“But this is the changing of the guard. All these guys can move it. You can get away with hitting the ball off-centre now, but you couldn’t get away with mis-hitting a golf ball before. It wasn’t important to hit the ball hard, it was more important to hit the ball flush, but now these kids tee it up and just go after it.

“My generation is getting older, but if I’m teeing up the goal’s to win it. That doesn’t change if I’m injured, coming off an injury, playing well or I’m playing poorly. If I’m in the event, it’s to win the event.

“I know I’ve accomplished some pretty neat things over the course of my career and I hope that I can continue.”

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