Monday 25 September 2017

Family duties blamed for fall in number playing golf

While golf has become less popular among young adults, an increasing number of older people, especially women, are playing the game. Photo: David Maher / Sportsfile (stock)
While golf has become less popular among young adults, an increasing number of older people, especially women, are playing the game. Photo: David Maher / Sportsfile (stock)

Ian Begley

Young adults spending more time with their families is the reason why fewer people are playing golf, a new report has found.

The research, commissioned by the Confederation of Golf in Ireland (CGI), assesses patterns of participation as well as exploring people's motivation and patterns of playing.

While the sport has become less popular among young adults, an increasing number of older people, especially women, are playing the game.

Dr Pete Lunn, co-author of the report, told the Irish Independent that he was surprised to find that the decline in club membership levels isn't due so much to economic factors, but to the change of family lifestyles.

"While golf continues to boom among older adults in their 60s, 70s and 80s, participation is dwindling among people under 50," he said. "We have found that the decline is linked to family life, particularly adults who have children.

"Initially, you might think it was due to the economic crisis, but that turned out not to be much of a big factor. The fall in participation is somewhat larger among people in higher income brackets.

"It seems people have greater family commitments these days and men are more involved in spending time with their kids during the weekend."

Irish Independent

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