Thursday 27 April 2017

Video evidence voted in at Congress

Dublin’s Carla Rowe shoots for a point which was incorrectly given as a wide during Sunday’s ladies football All-Ireland final Piaras Ó Mídheach/Sportsfile Photo by Piaras Ó Mídheach/Sportsfile
Dublin’s Carla Rowe shoots for a point which was incorrectly given as a wide during Sunday’s ladies football All-Ireland final Piaras Ó Mídheach/Sportsfile Photo by Piaras Ó Mídheach/Sportsfile
Independent.ie Newsdesk

Independent.ie Newsdesk

Ladies football - The Ladies Gaelic Football Association has moved to ensure that there is no repeat of the controversy surrounding last year's TG4 All-Ireland senior final by approving the use of video evidence.

Carla Rowe's point, which was clearly inside the posts, was waved wide by match officials and Dublin's sense of grievance was heightened when they lost the showpiece decider by the bare minimum.

The HawkEye score-detection technology was not in use for the decider between Cork and Dublin - but it's unlikely to be in place this year either.

The exact way in which video evidence will be used has yet to be finalised but an LGFA source has indicated that, for televised matches only, an independent observer can signal to the match referee if there is a problem with a score.

The independent reviewer will make contact with the referee if a score which has been indicated as wide was in fact a point, or vice-versa, while video evidence will also come into play to decide whether or not the ball crossed the goal-line.

Congress also reported that the number of juvenile dental claims through the LGFA injury fund has halved since the introduction of mandatory mouth guards.

It also emerged that a combined total of 326 knee injury claims between adults and juveniles in 2016 included 97 for anterior cruciate knee ligament problems - a significant increase on 2015 figures.

Irish Independent

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