Wednesday 28 September 2016

Tribe to push for Leinster 'home-away' arrangement

Published 02/06/2015 | 02:30

Galway chairman Noel Treacy has called on Leinster counties to engage in ‘home and away’ arrangements with them 'in the interests of fairness and equity'
Galway chairman Noel Treacy has called on Leinster counties to engage in ‘home and away’ arrangements with them 'in the interests of fairness and equity'

Galway will step up their attempts for 'equality' as a Leinster hurling county at the end of the championship after Pearse Stadium was overlooked for Saturday night's quarter-final replay with Dublin.

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Galway chairman Noel Treacy has called on Leinster counties to engage in 'home and away' arrangements with them "in the interests of fairness and equity" and cross the Shannon to play championship hurling in the future. He says they will revisit the issue later this year.

Leinster Council have relaxed the proviso that all games involving Galway and Antrim must be played in Leinster, initially a condition of their acceptance into the province in 2009. But so far no county has been willing to extend them an opportunity to enter a home-and-away agreement.

"Nobody put their hand up to make a home-and-away arrangement with them so it had to go to a neutral venue," said Leinster Council chairman John Horan.

Horan said Galway were being afforded the same status as everyone else. "They have equal status in Leinster because everyone else is in the exact same position. It's not a case of re-negotiating with Leinster Council."

Horan accepted criticism of the decision to play the Galway-Dublin game as a curtain-raiser to the Dublin-Longford football quarter-final on Sunday and said they discussed a change in the last three weeks.

"It's a fair point. We did look at it two-and-a-half weeks ago to change it but at that stage tickets had already been sold. You could argue that the media would have got the message out there.

"If similar circumstances were repeated next year, we'd put the football on first. Hurling should always be the second on the bill, where possible, because of the pace of the game."

There were 22,000 in Croke Park just before half-time in the hurling match.

Irish Independent

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