Wednesday 7 December 2016

Roundabouts, tunnels and gates

Published 05/12/2011 | 05:00

Tadhg Kennelly returned home to attend a special presentation which saw a roundabout located at the top of Cahirdown in Listowel named after his late, great father, Tim.

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Tim 'Horse' Kennelly, who died in 2005, won five All-Irelands with Kerry and joins a growing list of sportsmen who have had places and things named after them.

Matt Busby Way

Formerly known as Warwick Road North, the road which leads to the East Stand at Old Trafford was renamed after the former Manchester United manager in 1993, who guided the club to European Cup success in 1968. Busby died less than a year later.

More recently, United unveiled the Alex Ferguson Stand to commemorate the Scot's 25 years at the helm.

Jack Lynch Tunnel

Cork legend Jack Lynch won six successive All-Irelands between hurling and football in the 1940s and was elected Fianna Fail TD for Cork in

1948, going on to become Taoiseach in 1966. The 610-metre tunnel was first proposed in 1978. It opened in 1999, the year of Lynch's death after a €130m development programme.

Shankly Gates

The Gates (pictured) were erected in 1982 in memory of one of Liverpool's most famous managers, Bill Shankly, who had died a year earlier. The gates are on the Anfield Road side, next to the Hillsborough memorial. Across the gates are the words 'You'll Never Walk Alone'.

Stockwell-Purcell Road

In 1999 a new road in Tuam was named after Galway's famous 'Terrible Twins', Frank Stockwell and Seanie Purcell. Stockwell scored 2-5 as Galway defeated Cork by 2-13 to 3-7 in the 1956 All-Ireland final -- a scoring record by a player which was never surpassed in a 60-minute final. Purcell was chosen on both the Team of the Century and Team of the Millennium, while the pair also led Tuam Stars to a record seven Galway SFC titles in a row. Purcell died in 2005, while Stockwell passed away four years later, aged 80.

Irish Independent

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