Friday 21 July 2017

Paul Galvin: Rob Hennelly left himself open to online criticism

Mayo goalkeeper Rob Hennelly drops the ball which led to refereee Maurice Deegan awarding a penalty to Dublin during the GAA Football All-Ireland Senior Championship Final Replay match between Dublin and Mayo at Croke Park
Mayo goalkeeper Rob Hennelly drops the ball which led to refereee Maurice Deegan awarding a penalty to Dublin during the GAA Football All-Ireland Senior Championship Final Replay match between Dublin and Mayo at Croke Park
Paul Galvin has some words of warning for the Kingdom’s prodigious three-in-a-row All-Ireland minor winners. Photo: Stephen McCarthy/Sportsfile

Michael Verney

Paul Galvin insists that Mayo goalkeeper Rob Hennelly left himself open to criticism when he posted a message to Mayo fans on social media following his county's All Ireland defeat to Dublin.

Hennelly took to social media to express his heartache after a below-par performance against Dublin and in his Sunday Independent column, Joe Brolly described the move as "a PR exercise that sums up Mayo’s celebrity losers”.

Kerry legend Galvin, speaking at AIB's launch of their Start-up Academy for 2016-2017, said: "Well, I wouldn't have been one for using social media while I was playing, and explaining myself or expressing myself in that manner.

"If you do that, you are opening yourself up to a right of reply. People have a right of reply if you post something like that up on social media. If you do that, and you get a reply or response that you don't like, I don't think you can complain too much about it."

Galvin added that reaching out to the public has no benefits in such situations.

"Yeah, that is the way I saw it. I don't know if reaching out to the public like that, I don't know how it helps you get along. Maybe it does, it wasn't something I particularly did a whole lot of myself."

Having gradually risen through the underage ranks before embarking on an explosive Kerry senior career, Galvin has some words of warning for the Kingdom's prodigious three-in-a-row All-Ireland minor winners.

Players like Mark O'Connor, David Clifford and Sean O'Shea are being billed as the stars of the future but early success often leads to great expectations and four-time All-Ireland winner Galvin urges caution in Kerry.

"I played on a minor team with Tadhg Kennelly and Noel Kennelly and I think we were the only three to go on and play senior. Now we didn't win All-Ireland minors but I don't think many would've picked me out to go and do what I did," Galvin said at AIB's launch of their Start-up Academy for 2016-2017.

"There's a couple of obvious candidates from the minor team at the moment but you never know. The guy with the real talent may not come through, more of a worker with a bit of an attitude might come through so it's hard to predict minors and what they can do at senior level."

Watching

With O'Connor in talks with a string of Australian Rules clubs, Galvin is watching the situation closely as he believes he's "going to be key for Kerry over the next 10-12 years". And despite a blue cloud hanging over the game after Dublin's back-to-back exploits, Galvin doesn't believe Kerry "are miles off the pace".

"Not by any means are they a million miles off the pace, very close to the pace but looking at the replayed final, I feel like Dublin and Mayo were that little fraction ahead maybe of where Kerry might be but they have to be full of hope for next year. They'll definitely be contending."

One man who will not be donning the Kingdom jersey next year, however, is Marc Ó Sé, who brought the curtain down on his glittering inter-county career.

"His family represent the true essence of Kerry football with their personality, self-belief and commitment to the jersey no matter what," Galvin said. "We won't see a player like him again. I'm lucky to have shared a dressing-room with him."

Irish Independent

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