Wednesday 29 March 2017

Kingdom back 'mark' move

KERRY and Dublin will take opposing positions on the adoption of the mark to Congress this weekend.

Both County Boards discussed the playing rule changes at meetings on Monday, with Dublin opting to oppose its introduction on a permanent basis.

Kerry, however, will support it, no doubt heartened by the performances of Seamus Scanlon and Mike Quirke, who took nine marks between them against Monaghan on Sunday.

Both Kerry and Dublin carry the maximum number of delegates to Congress, so their positions on important votes tend to carry weight.

Kerry will also lend support to the change in distance that the penalty is taken from and uniformity of distance that the kick-out is taken from.

They will oppose the square ball experiment becoming permanent and the use of the fisted pass only.

No specific motion on the conclusion of a half is brought before Congress, but Kerry believe it is a system worth pursuing if players can be made aware in some way that a game is over.

"We'd support a hooter system or some way of making it known to players," said chairman Jerome Conway.

Dublin will back the retention of the fisted pass as trialled in the league and will also back the new distance for penalties and kick-outs. But, like Kerry, they will oppose allowing players into the square before the ball arrives from general play.

Meath also discussed rule changes at their meeting and with the Skryne club putting forward a motion for the introduction of the mark, it was inevitable that they would also support it.

Changes to the way games end will also be backed, as Meath have a specific motion on that issue.

Meanwhile, bans are still hanging over the chairman and secretary of London's County Board, despite them flying back to Ireland last week for an appeal hearing. They may yet have to sit out next weekend's annual Congress in Down as a result.

Irish Independent

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