Sport Gaelic Football

Friday 19 September 2014

McGee promises FRC will ‘fight to the death’ for support at Congress

Published 23/03/2013 | 05:00

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Eugene McGee

THE GAA's Football Review Committee (FRC) last night pledged to "fight to the death" to convince Congress to support their proposed rule changes in today's crucial vote.

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As delegates from home and abroad battled through the bad weather on their way to Derry for Congress, McGee and his FRC colleagues were ramping up their efforts to sway enough delegates to back their initiatives.

"We're not dead in the water yet," said McGee. "There was a lot of talk during the week about all the counties that have said 'yes' and 'no'. That's not the point.

"There are still around 100 votes not attached to any camp – delegates from foreign boards as well as various GAA committees and former presidents.

"We feel that every single vote has to be fought for at this stage."

Stressing the FRC's commitment to the proposals, he said they were "prepared to fight to the death" to get the two-thirds majority required to have the proposed changes written into rule.

"We believe in what we are doing – we have spent 12 months at this. We all do it for the good of football.

"We think we can adorn the game a bit more by getting rid of the nasty type of fouling that has crept in."

Several counties have mandated their delegates to vote either for or against the proposals but since the electronic ballot is secret, it's possible that some may break ranks.

Paul Earley and Tim Healy will present the opening case for the FRC in today's debate.

Meanwhile, the promotion of games attracted attention at last night's opening Congress session, with the view being expressed that much more is needed to be done.

Gerard O'Kane (Derry) said that players should be more available to the media for interviews and urged managers to allow them to do so.

Dublin county secretary John Costello said that players were the GAA's best ambassadors and the greater their availability to the media, the more it benefited the promotion of games.

Irish Independent

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