Sponsored

Wednesday 1 October 2014

74 per cent of children want to know where their food comes from

Research carried out by Kellogg’s shows that a high percentage of children are interested in where their food comes from. However, that same research points out, that it is an area a lot of young people are confused about.

Published 24/06/2014 | 16:57

  • Share
  • Share
  • Go To

Research carried out by Kellogg’s shows that a high percentage of children are interested in where their food comes from. However, that same research points out, that it is an area a lot of young people are confused about.

In fact, ask a child where cereal comes from and chances are they’ll say the supermarket.

“A lot of kids didn’t realise that their breakfast cereal was made from grains that grew in a field,” says Richard Burkinshaw, Project Manager of the Kellogg’s Origins Programme. Richard attributes this to the fact that 39 per cent of Irish children have never even visited a farm that grows food.

Almost two thirds (65%) of children would like to see where their food is grown and when children were asked where they

learn about food, school came out on top (80 per cent) followed by home (69 per cent). Nearly two-fifths (39 per cent) use books to get their foodie fix.

 

National Schools Partnership

To educate children about the origins of their food, Kellogg’s are partnering with the National Schools Partnership to develop a new teaching aid for teachers.

The material, which will reach over 300 primary schools across the UK and Ireland, will help teachers inspire thousands of children to learn about their food and where it comes from. Focussing on the lifecycle of grains, children will gain a clear understanding of how the grains grow and then get from the farm to their morning breakfast cereal.

“I’ve attended a number of events recently – for example Open Farm Sunday which washeld in one of the farms that supplies Kellogg’s with wheat – that really showed children’s appetite for this kind of information.

“The event attracted over 200 visitors – including parents and children – who came to see how we transform wheat growing in a field into our delicious cereals. During the event children got to count the number of grains on stalks of wheat; saw how the grains were cleaned, crushed and sieved; learnt about how farmers look after their soil and the benefits of using beetles to help control pests rather than pesticides.

“Both the kids and their parents learned a lot about what goes on behind the scenes. It was great to see people getting excited about what we do every day.”

 

What is the Kellogg’s Origins Programme

The Kellogg’s Origins programme was set up two years ago in an effort to ensure that only the best quality ingredients make it into your morning breakfast cereal.

Richard Burkinshaw is Project Manager of the Kellogg’s Origins Programme. His role involves working with farmers across Europe to help them produce the best quality grains and implement sustainable practices to do so.

“As part of Kellogg’s Origins we are working with 16 farmers who supply the wheat used in Bran Flakes, Special K, Sultana Bran and Mini Max.

“This involves us bringing in experts to help the farmers with any issues or challenges they may have, taking the farmers of the 16 farms on field visits to see best practice in action and providing specialist help to volunteers within the group who will share the results of the initiative.”

To find out more information about the seeds and grains used in Kellogg’s cereals log onto www.kelloggs.ie.

Read More

Most Read

Independent.ie on Twitter

Most Shared

Latest Commented

Neighbours threaten to decapitate boy (15)

What about  the victims who  have to put up with this sort of lowlife,  oh i forgot,  they dont  rate, it's  the poor lowlife  who   are really…

liffeylink

Editor's Choice