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Tuesday 2 September 2014

Stars of the past

The annual Seana Ghael awards will be presented in Ferrycarrig Hotel on Sunday, January 27, with 76 worthy recipients joining the hall of fame. P.J. DALY of the organising committee will profile those being honoured in a series starting in this issue.

Published 15/01/2013 | 10:16

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AIDAN QUIRKE (OYLEGATE-GLENBRIEN) - Aidan Quirke from Ballydonfin near Glenbrien was a stonewall and uncomprising defender for his club, Oylegate-Glenbrien. When playing at right halfback, a position he usually occupied during his career, he was reliable and steadfast.

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All through his years he displayed remarkably high levels of dedication, resolve and skill. His smooth, sublime skills in lifting, controlling, handling and striking the ball were absolutely superb. In his No. 5 jersey his tight, vigilant covering and his clever play left very little for his opponents to take advantage. With his unhurried style, his calm demeanour, his composure and vision he was always a foot or two ahead of his opponent.

He was born in 1941 and was educated at Glenbrien N.S. and Enniscorthy V.S. His boyhood hero was Nickey Rackard R.I.P. Aidan's finest hour playing with Oylegate-Glenbrien was versus Rathnure in the 1963 Co. Senior hurling semifinal. In that game, playing at right half-back, his judgement, his skill and control were excellent and he epitomised all that is splendid and constructive in good defending. His first-time clearances had length and direction. In a dazzling display one of his greatest attributes was his ability to read the game and his awareness when in possession of the ball, to allow one of his forwards to benefit from his clearances.

Sadly, after a knee injury in 1964 he had to retire from the game he loved and his loss to the club was immense. There was so much hurling left in this outstanding player. The three hurlers he would select as the best he has seen over the past 40 years, excluding Oylegate-Glenbrien players, were Liam Dunne, Tony Doran and Mick Jacob.

He was a selector and Chairman for his club. The best dual player he has seen in Wexford was Paddy Kehoe (Gusserane). He first played Intermediate with his club in 1959. His brother, Michael, also played Intermediate hurling. The four players he selects as the best he has seen playing with Oylegate-Glenbrien were Pat Nolan, Mick Bennett R.I.P., John Nolan R.I.P. and Ned Hanlon R.I.P.

The four players he selects as the most difficult that he played on in his hurling career were Oliver McGrath, Paul Lynch, Dick Murphy and Martin Nolan R.I.P. (Blackwater). The three players he selects as the best he has seen in Wexford while hurling were Billy Rackard R.I.P., Tim Flood and Mick Jacob. His dad and uncle Mick played Minor hurling with Killisk, The Ballagh, in 1928.

He was a substitute on the Wexford Minor team in 1959 and in a National League match with Wexford Seniors. He won one Co. Intermediate medal in 1959 and one Co. Senior medal in 1963, both with Oylegate-Glenbrien. The best game of hurling he has seen in Wexford was Rathnure versus St. Aidan's in the 1955 Co. Senior hurling final. He played Minor hurling with Ardcolm in 1958 and 1959.

The most exciting game of hurling that he played in was Oylegate-Glenbrien versus Shamrocks in the Echo Shield in 1963. The best club team he has seen in hurling was Rathnure in the early '70s. The best goalie he has seen was Pat Nolan (Oylegate-Glenbrien). He also played football with his club until his injury. Of the present-day hurlers, Tommy Walsh (Kilkenny) and Joe Canning (Galway) stand out.

AIDAN ROCHE (CLONGEEN/GLYNN-BARNTOWN)

Aidan Roche, who now resides in Ballygoman in the parish of Glynn-Barntown, was for almost 26 years a top-class dual player. Originally from Little Cullenstown, he was a much-travelled player in his long and distinguished career.

He started off playing Juvenile hurling with Camross in 1953 and 1954 and Juvenile football with St. Munn's in the same years. He played Minor as in Juvenile, and his first adult game was in 1958 with the above clubs in Junior. In 1960 and 1961 he played with Gusserane O'Rahilly's and from 1962 until 1975 he was playing with Clongeen. Finally from 1976 until 1984 he was a regular in both hurling and football with Glynn-Barntown before he retired at 44 years young.

In hurling his favourite position was right half-back and in football he played everywhere including in goal. In hurling he was a master of all the skills as his speed, his fleetness of foot, his balance, his ball control and vision combined with his consummate ability were features which endeared him to friend and foe alike.

He was born in 1940 and was educated at Little Cullenstown N.S. His two boyhood heroes were Nickey Rackard R.I.P. and Padge Kehoe R.I.P. His finest hour in the hurling jersey for Glynn-Barntown was in the Co. Junior hurling final versus Ballyfad in 1976. At wing-back he gave a brilliant performance, and his ball control, his clean striking and his long clearances were highlights of the hour.

The best dual player he has ever seen in Wexford was Martin Quigley. The two best dual players he has seen in Ireland were Des Foley R.I.P. (Dublin) and Jimmy Barry Murphy (Cork).

Aidan's medal collection was one Co. Junior football (Clongeen, 1970), one Co. Junior hurling (Glynn-Barntown, 1976) and one Co. Junior football (GlynnBarntown, 1982). This was added to with District and league medals too. He also played for the New Ross District teams in hurling and football.

His two brothers, Michael R.I.P. and Seán, also played hurling and football in their careers with Clongeen. He was a selector many times with his club, a Secretary in Clongeen, Treasurer with Glynn-Barntown, Chairman with Bord na nOg, trainer and selector many times with the Co. hurling and football Under-14 and Under-16 teams, and successfully trained many hurling teams in GlynnBarntown.

The best individual display he has seen at club level was by Padge Kehoe (St. Aidan's, Enniscorthy) who was brilliant and unmarkable in every club match. The four hurlers he selects as the best he has seen playing with his clubs were Pat Greene (Glynn-Barntown), John Kelly (Glynn-Barntown), Con Donnelly (Clongeen) and Paddy Bennett (Clongeen).

The four hurlers he would select as the most difficult he played on were Jack Berry R.I.P. (St. Anne's) and Jimmy Galway (Adamstown) in hurling, and Pat Leacy (Ballyhogue) and Johnny Doyle (St. James') in football. The two hurlers he selects as the best he has seen in Ireland were Christy Ring R.I.P. (Cork) and Pat Stakelum R.I.P. (Tipperary).

The two hurlers he selects as the best he has seen in Wexford were Padge Kehoe and Nick O'Donnell. The best game of hurling he has seen in Wexford was the Senior final with Rathnure versus St. Aidan's in 1955.

ALO DOYLE (FERNS ST. AIDAN'S)

Alo Doyle, originally from Ferns and now living in Gorey, was for a number of years an outstanding footballer. He was an elusive and crafty forward whose speed allowed him to outsmart and outwit a number of his markers. He played most of his football in the half-forward line, where he could show off his fleetness of foot combined with his intelligence and excellent balance which made him pass his markers repeatedly.

He started his career playing Juvenile hurling and football in 1951. He played both grades in Minor hurling with Ferns and football with the famous Young Irelands in 1952, 1953 and 1954. They reached the Co. Minor football semi-final in 1951, but lost out to Geraldine O'Hanrahans. Alo came on as a substitute.

He came back to Ferns to look after the family business and got back into the frame with Ferns again. From the mid '50s unitl 1965 he was a regular member of this team in both Junior and Senior football. He was born in 1936 and was educated at Ferns N.S. and St. Peter's College, Wexford. His boyhood hero was Fr. Rory Deane. He was on the Ferns committee for a few years. His late brother, Brendan, also played for Ferns. The two best dual players he has seen in Wexford were Tom Guinan and Paddy Kehoe.

Of the present-day footballers playing with Wexford he selects Redmond Barry, Ciarán Lyng and Colm Morris as the best. In Ireland, Colm Cooper (Kerry) stands out as one of the greatest to play football, while Peter Canavan (Tyrone) was another gifted player.

When Alo was in St. Peter's College the footballer who stood out was John Gallahue who was a class act in the No. 6 jersey. His finest hour playing with Ferns was versus Castletown in a tournament final played in Bellefield which they won. Ferns had a surprise win and he excelled in this encounter. His speed of thought, his pace and flair were first class.

He got a Co. Minor football trial with Wexford in 1953. The greatest display he has seen in hurling was given by the late Bobby Rackard versus Cork in 1954. Alo was on the Ferns Senior football panel which lost two Co. finals in 1954 and 1955.

The best individual display he has seen at club level was by Pa Plummer at centre-back in the 1954 Co. Senior football final versus Gusserane. The four footballers he selects as the best he has seen playing with Ferns were Tom Furlong R.I.P., Pa Plummer, Mylie Breen R.I.P. and Micheál O'Neill. The four footballers he selects as the most difficult that he played on while playing with Ferns were Larry O'Shaughnessy (Castletown), Charlie Leonard (Castletown), Michael 'Foxy' Breen (Gorey) and Nick Asple (Ballyhogue).

The three footballers he selects as the best he has seen in Ireland were Jim McKeever (Derry), Mick O'Connell (Kerry) and Colm Cooper (Kerry). The three footballers he selects as the best he has seen in Wexford were Willie Goodison R.I.P. (Volunteers), Rory Deane (Bunclody) and Paddy Kehoe.

The best game of football he has seen in Wexford was the 1954 Co. Senior final with Gusserane (1-5) versus Ferns (1-3). The most exciting game of football that he played in was the Co. Minor semi-final against Geraldine O'Hanrahans (New Ross) in 1951.

ANDY CARTY (DAVIDSTOWN/CLOUGHBAWN)

One of the truly outstanding backs to play for Davidstown-Courtnacuddy and later with Cloughbawn was Andy Carty who is originally from Courtnacuddy but is now residing a few miles from Clonroche.

He was never one for the rough stuff. He was a gentleman and still is on and off the field. He always believed in playing the game even though his opponents could never manage to get away from his vice-like grip that was part and parcel of this wholehearted and dynamic defender's game.

He excelled in close exchanges and was hardly ever beaten for possession, and his clearances were long and well directed. One of his finest games playing with Davidstown-Courtnacuddy was versus Buffers Alley in the 1963 Co. Intermediate hurling final.

In this encounter he showed immaculate courage, had a high level of skill, was fiercely competitive and was completely on top in his duels with his opponent. Andy's overall performance in this game was brilliant. His tackling, blocking, striking and clearing were out of the top drawer.

He was born in 1941 and was educated at Courtnacuddy N.S. His boyhood hero was Tim Flood. The best dual player he has seen in the county was Phil Wilson. He played with Davidstown-Courtnacuddy from 1959 to 1969 and with Cloughbawn from 1970 to 1979.

The best individaul display he has seen was by Mick Jacob in the 1974 Co. Senior hurling final - Oulart-The Ballagh versus Rathnure. He won All-Ireland and Leinster medals in Intermediate with Wexford in 1964 playing at left cornerback. This was memorable for him to bring home those coveted medals.

At club level he won two Intermediate hurling medals in 1963 and 1973, and two Junior honours in 1961 and 1972, with Davidstown-Courtnacuddy and Cloughbawn. He was a selector and committee member with Cloughbawn. He had one brother, Jim, who also played.

The two hurlers he selects as the best he has seen in Ireland and outside of Wexford were Eddie Keher and Brian Whelahan (Offaly). The four hurlers he selects as the most difficult that he played on in his career were Mick Butler (Buffers Alley), Joe Murphy (Rathnure), Christy Jacob (Oulart-The Ballagh) and Eddie Cousins (St. Martin's).

The four players he selects as the best he has seen playing with Davidstown-Courtnacuddy were Jimmy Nolan, Sim Gallagher, Tommy Delaney and Liam Kehoe. The four he would select with Cloughbawn were Tom Walsh, Gerald Flood, John Fleming and Tommy Harrington.

The two hurlers he selects as the best he has seen in Wexford were Tim Flood and Nick O'Donnell R.I.P. The best game of hurling he has seen in Wexford was Cloughbawn versus Rathnure in the Co. Senior semi-final in 1993, with Cloughbawn winning by five points.

He played Juvenile with Caim-Kiltealy in 1956. He played Minor with Caim-Kiltealy in 1958 and Oulart-The Ballagh in 1959. The most exciting game of hurling that he played in was Enniscorthy District versus Rathnure in the Co. Senior final in 1971. The best goalie he has seen was the late Ollie Walsh.

BEN NOCTOR (KILANERIN)

Ben Noctor who now resides in Kilmurry just outside Gorey town is one of the longest-surviving Kilanerin footballer that played with the club. Apart from his family, football was his life and he enjoyed every game he played in. His dedication to the sport was unreal.

In 1957 while working in Galway he would finish work at 4 p.m. on a Saturday and then he had to go home and get ready to catch the 6 p.m. train to Dublin, getting there around 10 p.m.

His brother, Jack, came up from Wexford to meet him on his motorbike and it would be 12 midnight when they arrived home. He was up next morning for 11 a.m. Mass, then off to play football and then back Monday morning to Galway. How many players today would do a similar journey to play the game?

While in Galway he played with the Fr. Griffiths and did his training with the Co. team. He was born in 1927 and was educated at Kilanerin N.S. His boyhood hero was the late Nickey Rackard.

The two best footballers he has seen outside of Wexford were Seán Purcell R.I.P. (Galway) and Frankie Stockwell R.I.P. (Galway), a combination that could open up any defence. The two greatest dual players he has seen in Ireland were Michael 'Babs' Keating (Tipperary) and Des Foley R.I.P. (Dublin). The best under-age player he has seen was the late Dermot Earley from Roscommon.

The best two footballers he has seen in Wexford were Willie Goodison R.I.P. and Fr. Dermot Clancy R.I.P. from Ballinglen. The two best dual players he has seen in Wexford were Oliver Cullen and Paddy Kehoe.

He started playing Junior football with Kilanerin in 1947 and finished up in 1958 in a career that was most enjoyable, and he made many friends. He went to England in 1948 and played his football over there with Hertfordshire. He later returned to play with Kilanerin and finished up playing with them in 1958. His two brothers, Paddy R.I.P. and Mick R.I.P., also played.

The best individual display he has seen at club level was by his late brother, Paddy, playing centrefield for St. Mel's versus St. Pat's in the London Senior championship at the age of 16 and scoring two points. The man he was playing on was a Sligo Co. player who also played for Connacht. His name was Mick Christie.

The game he selects as having his finest hour in was the Tipperary Cup semi-final versus St. Pat's in London. The four footballers he selects as the most difficult that he played on while with Kilanerin were Mogue O'Neill R.I.P. (Kilrush), Mick Kennedy (Gorey Blues), Freddie Cudlipp (Castletown) and Seán Sheridan (Castletown).

The four footballers he selects as the best he has seen playing with Kilanerin were Mick D'Arcy, Pat Hempenstall, Jack Woodbyrne and Seamus Boland. The three footballers he selects as the best he has seen in Ireland were Mick O'Connell, Seán Purcell R.I.P. and Frankie Slockwell R.I.P. The three footballers he selects as the best he has seen in Wexford were Willie Goodison R.I.P., Dermot Clancy R.I.P. and Paddy Kehoe. The best game of football he has seen in Wexford was Kilanerin versus Castletown in the 2010 Co. Senior final.

BILL MURPHY (BUFFERS ALLEY)

One of the most gifted and stylish hurlers to come on the scene in the '60s and early '70's was Bill Murphy. The Buffers Alley craftsman had speed, skill, ball control and above all super vision. He was a natural performer on the hurling field and many of his markers found themselves chasing shadows.

Bill was lithe, clever, calm and cool and was always able to find the open spaces. His breathtaking scores from all angles and all distances were hallmarks of a master-class player. Every time he gained possession he bore down on his opponents' goal like a whirlwind and every move he made spelt danger. He was a supreme sportsman and never resorted to any foul play.

His contribution to his beloved Buffers Alley was immense and he gained respect and admiration from friends and foe alike. He was born in 1938 and was educated at Monamolin N.S. His boyhood hero was Nickey Rackard R.I.P. His brother, Jim, was also an outstanding hurler with Buffers Alley and received a Seana Ghael award in 2010.

One of the great goalkeepers he has seen was Pat Nolan (Oylegate-Glenbrien). The best dual player he has seen in Wexford was Oliver Cullen (Liam Mellows and Castletown). The two best dual players he has seen in Ireland were Teddy McCarthy (Cork) and Liam Currams (Offaly). One of the best club teams he has seen in Wexford was Buffers Alley, with Rathnure a close second.

Bill first played Junior hurling with Buffers Alley in 1955 and last played with them in 1973. He won two Co. Senior hurling medals with Buffers Alley in 1968 and 1970 and one Intermediate medal in 1965. He was also an excellent footballer, playing as a half-back.

He played Juvenile and Minor hurling with St. Patrick's, Buffers Alley and Ballygarrett. His finest hour in the Buffers Alley colours was in the 1968 Co. Senior hurling final. The best three hurlers he has seen in Ireland in the last ten years were Tommy Walsh (Kilkenny), Lar Corbett (Tipperary) and Henry Shefflin (Kilkenny). The best three hurlers he has seen in Wexford in the past 40 years were Tony Doran, Mick Jacob and Dan Quigley.

The five Buffers Alley players he would select as the best he has seen playing with them were Mick Butler, Tony Doran, Seán Dempsey, Mick Kinsella and Tom Dempsey. The four hurlers he selects as the most difficult that he played on while playing with Buffers Alley were Lar Rigley (Shamrocks), Liam Bennett R.I.P. (Faythe Harriers), Nicky Doyle R.I.P. (Ballyhogue) and Tom Guinan (Ferns St. Aidan's). He played Intermediate hurling for Wexford in 1966.

The two hurlers he selects as the best he has seen in Ireland were John Doyle R.I.P. (Tipperary) and Bobby Rackard R.I.P. The two hurlers he selects as the best he has seen in Wexford were Bobby Rackard R.I.P. and Ned Wheeler. The best game of hurling he has seen in Wexford was Buffers Alley versus Rathnure in the Under-21 final in 1965. There was great joy in the parish when Buffers Alley won their first Co. Senior hurling title in 1968, and when they won All-Ireland Club honours in 1989. He selects Tony Doran as a special individual in the club, a great leader and motivator.

BILL WHITTY (ST. FINTAN'S)

Bill Whitty, who now resides at Ballyknocken in Rosslare Harbour, was a longterm player and supporter with the St. Fintan's club. He is still very much interested in the affairs of the G.A.A. in the county and travels to most games in Wexford Park. He first played Junior football with St. Fintan's in 1955 and his last game with them was in 1961. He played with St. Mary's (Rosslare) in 1962,1963 and 1964 and he retired shortly after this. He played Juvenile football with St. Fintan's in 1950 and 1951 and Minor football with the club in 1952 and 1953.

He normally played his football in the left half-forward position where his speed, self-belief and composure were features of his play. Bill's finest hour in the St. Fintan's jersey was versus St. Munn's in the Wexford District Junior football championship playing in the half-forward line. He was in great form, winning possession repeatedly and bringing his fellow forwards into the play to carry on his good outfield work. Bill was born in 1935 and was educated at Tagoat N.S.

His boyhood hero was Willie Goodison R.I.P. The best dual player he has seen in Wexford was George O'Connor for St. Martin's. The best dual player he has seen in Ireland was Des Foley R.I.P. (Dublin). The best dual player he has seen with the St. Fintan's club was Nicky Newport. The most exciting game that he played in was versus St. Munn's in 1961. It was so close and competitive that the result was in doubt until the final whistle.

Bill remembers one of the best games of football that he has seen was the 2011 Co. Senior football final when Horeswood defeated Castletown, and also the game between Tyrone versus Wexford in the 2002 qualifier in Wexford Park. Of the great Wexford team in the ' 50s his favourites were Bobby Rackard R.I.P., Nickey Rackard R.I.P., Ned Wheeler and Tim Flood. Bill was overjoyed when St. Fintan's won the Co. Senior football championship in 1980, defeating Half Way HouseBunclody in the final.

The best individual display that he has seen at club level was by Nick Newport with St. Fintan's versus St. Munn's in 1961 in the Wexford District Junior football championship. The five football players he selects as the best he has seen playing with St. Fintan's were Nick Newport, Jim Morris R.I.P., Jimmy Finn, Bobby O'Dowd and Pat Murphy R.I.P. The football players he selects as the most difficult he has played on while playing with St. Fintan's were Billy Devereux R.I.P. (Our Lady's Island), Frank Kavanagh (Sarsfields), Liam Butler (St. Martin's), Seán Devereux R.I.P. (Our Lady's Island) and Ray Doyle (Our Lady's Island).

The three football players he would select as the best he has seen in Ireland were Jack O'Shea (Kerry), Peter Canavan (Tyrone) and Matt Connor (Offaly). The three football players he selects as the best he has seen in Wexford were Matty Forde (Kilanerin), Seán Turner (St. Mary's) and Paco Sheehan (Sarsfields). He had one uncle that also played. His favourite position when playing was wing-forward. In football the best goalie he has seen in Ireland was John O'Leary (Dublin).

BILLY MURPHY (ST. PATRICK'S)

Billy Murphy, who now resides at Ballydaniel a few hundred yards from the village of Camolin, was a lifelong supporter of the St. Patrick's (Ballyoughter) hurling and football clubs. He was born in 1936 and was educated at Camolin N.S. His boyhood hero was the late Nickey Rackard.

He started his career in the Juvenile grade in 1951 and 1952, playing hurling and football with the Valley Rovers, and continued on to play Minor in both hurling and football in 1953 and 1954 with the same club. He played his first Junior hurling game in 1955, also with the Valley Rovers. In 1956 the club changed its name to St. Patrick's (Ballyoughter) and Billy continued to play in a number of positions with them until the mid-'60s including lining out in the goal.

One of the most exciting games he played in was in 1960, with St. Patrick's winning by 4-7 to 3-1 versus Kilanerin. Billy was outstanding in goal. His finest hour in the St. Pat's jersey was versus Buffers Alley-Kilmuckridge 'B' team in 1958. When playing at left corner-forward he bagged himself two great goals and saw another two efforts coming back off the post. In that game he proved a big headache for the opposition. Billy was a selector for a number of years with St. Pat's, including when his team lost two Co. Junior hurling finals in a row in 1974 to Monageer-Boolavogue and 1975 to Blackwater. He was Chairman of the club in the 1990s for a few years and was a committee member for many years.

He selects the late Oliver Murray and Richie Blake as the two greatest officials he has ever seen in organising and controlling affairs. Both made the Gorey District what it is today, a master set-up. The best dual player he has seen in Wexford was Phil Wilson. The best footballer he has seen in the Gorey District was Bill Owley while the best hurler was Oliver Gough.

The best dual player he has seen in Ireland was Ray Cummins (Cork). He last played hurling for his club in 1964. The best individual display he has seen at club level was by Bill Murphy (Buffers Alley) in many games playing in the halfforward line, a brilliant player of real class. The four hurlers he selects as the best he has seen playing with St. Pat's were Har Doyle, Jack Carty, Andy Carton R.I.P. and Joe Howell R.I.P.

He selects Denis Howell, Tony Ryan and Andy Kerrigan as brilliant hurlers in later years. The four hurlers and footballers he selects as the most difficult he has played on while playing with St. Pat's were Bill Owley (Tara Rocks) and Seamus Kelly (Gorey Young Emmets) in football, and Jimmy Breen R.I.P. (Ballygarrett) and Bill Murphy (Buffers Alley) in hurling.

The three hurlers he selects as the best he has seen in Ireland were Josie Gallagher R.I.P. (Galway), Christy Ring R.I.P. (Cork), two great forwards, and Pat Stakelum R.I.P. (Tipperary). The three hurlers he selects as the best he has seen in Wexford were Bobby Rackard R.I.P., Tim Flood and Jim Morrissey R.I.P. He never won any medals, but he enjoyed every game in both codes. The best game of hurling he has seen in Wexford was Rathnure versus Buffers Alley in the 1988 Co. Senior final drawn game.

DAN HARRINGTON (SARSFIELDS)

From the time he arrived in Wexford from Cork in 1972, Dan joined up with the Sarsfields club. He was an outstanding and dedicated addition to the set-up. In his capacity as an official and committee member he was ever ready to fulfil whatever obligations that were entrusted to him.

Every spare moment Dan had he gave to the club willingly. He had the utmost respect for the Sarsfields' top members like the late, great 'Chief' Seán Siggins, the late Jim Crowley, the late Pa White and Jas Kirwan along with another number of lion-hearted workers. It was a great privilege, said Dan, to be associated with such renowned individuals and with such an excellent club.

He was born in 1931 and was educated at Rockwell College. His boyhood hero was the late Tadhg Crowley who was captain of the great Cork team which won the All-Ireland Senior football title in 1945. Another brilliant footballer from his home county was the late Paddy Harrington. The two best dual players he has seen in Ireland were Jimmy Barry Murphy (Cork) and Teddy McCarthy. In Wexford the best dual player he has seen was George O'Connor (St. Martin's).

The three best footballers he has seen in Ireland during the last 50 years were Pat Spillane (Kerry), Larry Tompkins (Cork) and Alan Brogan (Dublin). He selects Charlie Nelliigan (Kerry) as a super goalie. One of the best club teams he has seen in Wexford was the Duffry Rovers in the '80s and '90s. They won so many Senior football titles during that time.

Dan played hurling and football with Tig Malaga (Timoleague) in Cork, winning a medal with the club in 1952. His role with the Sarsfields was an exemplar one - Co. Board rep. for seven years., Senior selector for two years., Chairman of the club for one year, committee member for 35 years and Vice-President at the present moment. He was a steward in Wexford Park for 38 years, and with the Wexford Senior footballers he was their kit man for 26 years.

The three best footballers he has seen in Wexford in the past 30 years were Louis Rafter (Duffry Rovers), Michael Carty (Castletown) and his son, John Harrington (Sarsfields). One of the most exciting games of football he has seen was in the 1979 Co. Intermediate final when the Sarsfields won on the third occasion.

The late Jimmy Roche, apart from his role as a classic defender, was also a brilliant member of the Sarsfields club. The best individual displays he has seen at club level in Wexford were by Seamus Fitzhenry for the Duffry Rovers in a number of games when his club were at the top. The four footballers he selects as the best he has seen playing with the Sarsfields over the years were Jas Kirwan, Billy Dodd, John Harrington and Ger Halligan. In under-age he would select John Curtis, Liam Bent and Jim Roice as being superb. All of his four sons - John, Paul, Martin and Noel - played with the Sarsfields, with John and Paul playing with the Wexford Seniors. John had many, many outings with the Wexford Senior team.

DANNY KIRWAN (ST. BRENDAN'S CRAANFORD)

Danny Kirwan, who lives just a few miles from Gorey town, was in his playing days a stylish and wholehearted hurler with Craanford St. Brendan's. He played most of his hurling at right half-back where he always played his heart out with the club. He was very disappointed when his team lost a game.

When playing in his role as a defender, his marking was tenacious and quick and he was fast to cover his patch when danger threatened. Danny always remained calm and unruffled and his clearances out of defence were always well directed. He was a player with excellent spirit, courage in abundance and grim determination.

He was born in 1936 and was educated at Loreto Primary School and Gorey C.B.S. His boyhood hero was Nickey Rackard R.I.P. His brother, Brian, received a Seana Ghael award in 2011. He played Juvenile and Minor football with the Rockies in the early '50s.

His first adult club was Kilanerin and he moved over to play with Craanford in 1957. His first game with the club was when he came on as a substitute versus Buffers Alley. The two best dual players he has seen in Wexford were George O'Connor and Phil Wilson. The two best dual players he has seen in Ireland were Jimmy Barry Murphy (Cork) and Des Ferguson (Dublin). The best goalie he has seen in hurling was Tony Reddan (Tipperary).

He played Junior hurling with Kilanerin in 1955 and 1956. On the great Wexford team of the '50s the three players he admired most were Nickey Rackard R.I.P., Jim English R.I.P. and Ned Wheeler. One of his finest games playing for Craanford was versus Kilanerin in the Gorey District hurling championship in 1959. He played an outstanding role in defending his lines and his overall performance was in the top bracket.

One of the finest individual performances he has seen at club level was by Tommy Whitty at midfield for Craanford versus Ferns in round two of the Gorey District Junior hurling championship in 1956. The best club team he has seen over the years were Rathnure that won four Co. Senior hurling titles in the early '70s all in a row from 1971 to 1974 inclusive.

In the last 40 years,. the four hurlers that impressed him most in Wexford were Mick Jacob, Tony Doran, Dan Quigley and Colm Doran. Of the present-day hurlers the three he selects as the best are Tommy Walsh (Kilkenny), Henry Shefflin (Kilkenny) and Noel McGrath (Tipperary). The four hurlers he selects as the best he has seen playing with Craanford were Mylie Donohue, Red Mick Sullivan, Dan Byrne and Dan Kenny. The four hurlers he selects as the most difficult that he played on while playing with Craanford were Pa Grannell (Gorey), Paddy Sinnott (Buffers Alley), Patsy Morris (St. Patrick's) and Har Doyle (St. Patrick's).

The three hurlers he selects as the best he has seen in Ireland were Pat Stakelum R.I.P. (Tipperary), Willie John Daly (Cork) and Jimmy Doyle (Tipperary). The most exciting game he has seen was the 1968 Co. Junior hurling final when Craanford beat Na Fianna. One of his favourite full-backs in hurling was the late 'Diamond' Hayden (Kilkenny). The late Jim Doyle of The Glen was a great club official.

DICK DILLON (KILMORE)

Dick Dillon, who lives in Mulrankin near Bridgetown, was one of the club's best dual players with St. Patrick's (Kilmore) - as a player, as an official and as an administrator they didn't come any better. His willingness to go through fire and water for the good of his beloved Kilmore was very admirable. He commanded his position in the full-back and half-back lines with total conviction. Dick combined great skill with the right attitude and with his tight, vigilant covering left very little leeway for forwards to take advantage.

For his loyalty, dedication and hard work one would have to name him 'Mr. Kilmore' where the club is concerned. He won the double with Kilmore-Rathangan in 1957 when the club won two Co. Juvenile titles. He repeated this success in Minor in 1959, winning the double again. In 1962 the club won the Co. Junior football title with victory versus Castletown and the whole parish was joyful for weeks after.

The first year playing Senior football in 1963 was quite a good one as they ran St. Munn's in a good game to just a three-point defeat (0-7 to 0-4). Dick's finest hour in the St. Patrick's (Kilmore) colours was versus Gusserane in the 1962 Co. Junior football semi-final. He was quick and decisive in his tackling, crafty and clever in gaining possession, and his clearances were long and well directed.

He was born in 1941 and was educated in Mulrankin N.S. and St. Peter's College, Wexford. His boyhood heroes were Nickey Rackard R.I.P. in hurling and Paddy Kehoe in football. The best dual player he has seen in Wexford was Martin Quigley (Rathnure). His late father, Jimmy Dillon, won Co. Senior hurling honours with St. Anne's in 1924 and also played Senior with St. Fintan's in the '30s. Dick played adult football with Kilmore from 1959 to 1972 and hurling from 1959 to 1967. He was Chairman for terms in the '60s, '70s and '80s and Secretary for terms in the '90s and 2000s. He is also a committee member since 1959 and was a selector on various terms over the years. His two brothers, John and Eamonn, also played.

The five players he selects as the best he has seen playing with St. Patrick's (Kilmore) were Jim Hughes, Michael Rossiter and Scott Doran in football and Willie O'Neill and Oliver Roche in hurling. The four he selects as the most difficult he played on while with his club were Pete Crowley R.I.P. (Sarsfields) and Oliver Cullen (Castletown) in football and Dick Murphy (Faythe Harriers) and Paul Lynch (Shamrocks) in hurling.

The two footballers he selects as the best he has seen in Ireland were Mick O'Connell (Kerry) and Matt Connor (Offaly). The two footballers he selects as the best he has seen in Wexford were Willie Goodison R.I.P. and Matty Forde. He won one Juvenile football championship medal (1957), one Juvenile hurling championship medal (1957), one Minor football championship medal (1959), one Minor hurling championship medal (1959), one Junior football medal (1962) and one Senior hurling Echo Shield medal (1967). The most exciting game of football that he played in was winning the Junior football championship in 1962, bringing the first adult title to the parish and gaining Senior status.

DOM STAFFORD (DAVIDSTOWN-C'CUDDY)

Dom Stafford, who now resides in Jamestown a few miles from Enniscorthy, was the second eldest of three brothers who all contributed immensely to the progress made by the Davidstown-Courtnacuddy club in the '60s. Tom, the eldest of the men folk, received his Seana Ghael award in 2011.

Dom had a marvellous range of skills, brilliant stickwork, excellent vision, good balance and a lovely striker of the ball left or right. He normally lined out in the half-back line or midfield. When playing hurling he used his guile and craftsmanship rather than relying on physical contact to gain possession.

He was born in 1941 and was educated in Davidstown N.S., Enniscorthy C.B.S. and St. Peter's College, Wexford. His boyhood hero was Nickey Rackard R.I.P. His two brothers, Tom and Michael, wore the Davidstown-Courtnacuddy jersey for a number of years and were classy players. His late father, Jack Stafford, played with Ballyhogue in the late '20s and early '30s.

The best dual player he has seen in Wexford was Phil Wilson. Dom's finest hour wearing the Davidstown-Courtnacuddy jersey was in a drawn game in 1961 versus the Shelmaliers in Junior hurling. At right half-back he was outstanding, giving a textbook display of a high standard. He played with dash, courage, enthusiasm and a great amount of skill. His excellent judgement allowed him to outfox his opponent time and time again.

He played his hurling also with St. Martin's from 1966 to 1971. He was also a top-class footballer during his career. He started playing Junior hurling with DavidstownCourtnacuddy in 1958 and finished up with the club in 1976. He was a Chairman, selector and committee member with the club in the 1980s and 1990s. He played with St. Martin's while in the parish of Piercestown.

The best individual display he has ever seen at club level in hurling was by Jimmy Nolan at centre half-back versus the Shelmaliers in a drawn game in the 1961 Co. Junior final. The four hurlers he would select as the best he saw playing with Davidstown-Courtnacuddy were Jimmy Nolan, Liam Kehoe, John Murphy and Andy Carty.

The four hurlers he would select as the most difficult he played on while with Davidstown-Courtnacuddy or St. Martin's were Martin Nolan R.I.P. (Blackwater), Billy Kelly (Shelmaliers), Oliver McGrath (Faythe Harriers) and Seán Dowdall R.I.P. (Faythe Harriers). The two hurlers he selects as the best he has seen in Ireland were Henry Shefflin and Nick O'Donnell R.I.P. The two hurlers he selects as the best he has seen in Wexford were Mick Jacob and Tim Flood.

He won one Co. Junior hurling medal in 1961, one Co. Intermediate medal in 1963 and four District football and hurling medals in 1960, 1961, 1962 and 1963. He played Minor hurling with Caim-Kiltealy in 1958 and 1959. The most exciting game of hurling that he played in was St. Martin's versus Faythe Harriers in the Senior championship in Bellefield, Enniscorthy, in 1969.

The best club team he has seen was the Buffers Alley side when they were in their prime. The best goalie he has seen in hurling was Ollie Walsh (Kilkenny) and the best full-back he has seen was Nick O'Donnell.

DONAL O'BRIEN (VOLUNTEERS)

Donal O'Brien, who now resides at Kennedy Park in Wexford town, was from 1955 to 1967 one of the Volunteers' outstanding footballers. He played in a number of positions for the club - No. 2, No. 6, No. 8 and No. 11. In his day he possessed uncanny anticipation, superb agility and unlimited energy.

When he was playing in a defensive role he was cool, confident, strong and determined. When at midfield his speed, fielding and footwork were most admirable. Playing in the forward line, he was quick, decisive and elusive. He loved playing the game and he loved playing with the Volunteers.

Donal's only brother, Ger R.I.P., was one of the Volunteers' best defenders for a number of years. The best dual player he has seen in Wexford was Paddy Kehoe. He was born in 1936 and was educated at Wexford C.B.S. His boyhood hero was Willie Goodison R.I.P.

Donal's finest hour playing with the Volunteers was versus Our Lady's Island in 1956. His display in that encounter, his speed, his skill and the manner in which he anticipated the play and the excellent way he read every move from his No. 11 position were features of a brilliant performance. He registered 0-4 in a fine display.

He was the Treasurer of the Volunteers club for a number of years. He was also a top performer on the hurling field. All of his seven uncles, the Morris brothers (all deceased) were outstanding players with the Volunteers. John, Mylie, Matty, Tom, James, Tommy and Willie Morris were all stars in their day.

Donal loved playing football for the Volunteers. They were a great club to play with. Donal won no medals in his career, but he enjoyed every game he played in. He first played football for the Volunteers at Junior level in 1956 and last played for them in 1967. He also had trials with the Wexford Minor footballers in 1954.

The best individual display he has seen at club level was by John Morris R.I.P. versus Ballyhogue in the 1956 Co. Senior football final playing at full-forward. His power and strength upset the losers' defence. The four football players he selects as the best he has seen playing with the Volunteers were Willie Goodison R.I.P., John O'Connor R.I.P., John Morris R.I.P. and Frank Morris. The four football players he selects as the most difficult that he played on while playing with the Volunteers were Seán Sheridan (Castletown), Danny Sinnott (Our Lady's Island), Phil Maddock (St. Martin's) and Liam Butler (St. Martin's).

The three football players he selects as the best he has seen in Ireland wereColm Cooper (Kerry), Mick O'Connell (Kerry) and Peter Canavan (Tyrone). The three football players he selects as the best he has seen in Wexford were Willie Goodison R.I.P., Paddy Kehoe and John Morris R.I.P. He played Co. Junior with Wexford as a substitute in the early '60s.

He played Juvenile football with the Young Irelands in 1951 and 1952. He also played Minor football with the Young Irelands in 1952 and Minor football with the Volunteers in 1953 and 1954. The most exciting game of football that he has played in was the 1960 drawn Co. Junior football final versus Castletown.

DONIE DOYLE (GLYNN-BARNTOWN)

Donie Doyle, who now resides at Tomcoole, was in his hurling days one of the most elusive, clever and enterprising forwards to play the game of hurling. He started off his career playing Juvenile with Camross in 1958 and Minor in 1959 and 1960. He played Junior hurling with Camross up to 1963.

In 1964 he lined out with Glynn-Barntown and continued to play with them until 1985 when he retired. In his hurling career with them he won one Co. Junior medal in 1976. He also won one Special Junior hurling medal in 1971 when Glynn-Barntown united with St. Martin's.

Donie's skill in controlling, handling and striking the ball were on a par with anyone in the Wexford District. He could read a game very well and was most inventive and imaginative whenever he was in a scoring area. He was born in 1942 and was educated at Caroreigh N.S. and Glynn N.S.

His boyhood hero was the late Nickey Rackard. The best dual players he has seen in Wexford were Phil Wilson and Paddy Kehoe. Paddy along with Teddy McCarthy (Cork) were the two best dual players he has seen. The greatest goalie he has seen in hurling was Pat Nolan (Oylegate-Glenbrien).

Donie's finest hour playing with Glynn-Barntown was versus Faythe Harriers in the 1976 Wexford District Junior hurling semi-final. In this game he showed speed, ball control and stamina and adopted a simple, direct style which caused confusion to the opposition. His display was sheer coolness personified, using craftmanship and vision rather than relying on physical contact.

The two greatest hurling forwards he has seen were Jimmy Doyle and Tim Flood. The two greatest defenders were the late Bobby Rackard and Mick Roche. In Wexford he had great admiration for the late Jim Morrissey and Martin Quigley. He was an under-age selector and committee member.

The four hurlers he selects as the best he has seen playing with Glynn-Barntown were John Kelly, Andy Pierce, Pat Greene and John Barron. The four hurlers he selects as the most difficult that he played on while with Glynn-Barntown were Ollie Hearne (Shelmaliers), Jim O'Mahony (St. Martin's), Val Murphy R.I.P. (Shelmaliers) and Jimmy Finn (St. Fintan's). His father, Michael Doyle, and uncle, Andy Doyle, of Camross both played football.

The best game of hurling he has seen in Wexford was the 2003 Co. Senior final in which Glynn-Barntown played Rathnure. It was exciting as GlynnBarntown were up by six points with ten minutes to go. However, Paul Codd got a goal which brought Rathnure back into the match and they went on to win it out. It was a great game but disappointing in the end.

The three hurlers he selects as the best he has seen in Ireland in the last ten years were Lar Corbett (Tipperary), Henry Shefflin (Kilkenny) and Diarmuid Lyng (Wexford). The three hurlers he selects as the best he has seen in Wexford in the last 20 years were Diarmuid Lyng (St. Martin's), Damien Fitzhenry (Duffry Rovers) and Liam Dunne (Oulart-The Ballagh). The greatest hurling team he has seen in Wexford was Buffers Alley, a superb team throughout the '70s and well into the '80s.

EDDIE WALSH (BALLYHOGUE)

One of the most outstanding performers in the 1960s Senior football championships was Eddie Walsh from Ballyhogue. He was destined to be a star like his late father, Nick Walsh, who was one of Ireland's best in his playing days. His three late uncles were also brilliant.

Eddie was an outstanding wing half-back and was majestic in nearly every game he played in. He coloured the scene with regal performances and his authority in the air and his splendour on the ground were hallmarks of a star elite. So uncanny was his sense of positional play that the ball seemed destined to go in his direction. He would race superbly to capture every ball with grace and style and then deliver telling balls towards his opponents' goal.

He was born in 1940 and was educated at Enniscorthy C.B.S. The two players he idolised as a boy were Nickey Rackard R.I.P. and Paddy Kehoe. Eddie's finest hour, and there were many, was versus Kildare in a National League Group semi-final in 1967. He lorded his position with his usual commanding control. Any attack by the opposition was repulsed with ruthless efficiency. His long clearances were a tremendous boost to his colleagues and his timing and his vision enabled him to outwit his opposite number time and time again. Wexford won by 4-6 to 0-9 after a five-star display from the likeable Balllyhogue man.

Eddie now resides in Knocklyon Green, Terenure, Dublin. The two greatest footballers he has ever seen were Mick O'Connell and Jimmy Keaveney. The two greatest footballers he has seen in Wexford were Mickey Byrne R.I.P. and Matty Forde. He played Juvenile football with the Starlights in 1956. The four players he would select as the best he has seen playing with Ballyhogue were Mickey Byrne R.I.P., Nick Doyle, Nick Asple and Willie Foley R.I.P.

The four players he would select as the most difficult he played on in his football career at club level were Tommy Nolan (Sarsfields), Oliver Cullen (Castletown), Seán Sheridan (Castletown) and Jim Berry (Kilmore/St. Anne's). He also played for Wexford in Senior football in 1959 during the National League, Junior football in 1962 and 1963 when they won the Leinster but were beaten in the All-Ireland final by Kerry, and Senior football from 1964-1968.

He won one Juvenile football medal with the Starlights in 1956, one Junior football medal with Ballyhogue in 1961, three Senior football medals with Ballyhogue in 1962, 1963 and 1964, one Junior hurling medal with Ballyhogue in 1965, one Intermediate hurling medal with Ballyhogue in 1966, one Senior hurling medal with Oylegate-Glenbrien in 1963, one Leinster Junior football medal in 1963, one Leinster Intermediate hurling medal in 1965, and two Fitzgibbon Cup hurling medals with U.C.D. in 1963 and 1964.

The most exciting game that he played in was the 1963 football final versus the Starlights because of the Ballyhogue-Starlights history and the close scoring. The best dual players he has ever seen in Wexford were Paddy Kehoe (Gusserane) and Joe Foley (Ballyhogue). He first played Senior football with Balllyhogue in 1959 and last played for them in 1973 after being away from 1968 to 1972 in the U.S. and Canada.

FERGUS HALL (SARSFIELDS)

Fergus Hall, originally from Hill Street, Wexford town and now residing at Pineridge Estate, was for ten years one of Sarsfields' most outstanding defenders. Usually playing at corner-back, his prodigious kicking of dead balls was a treat. In the air on high balls he was brilliant and on low ones he was assured and confident. He represented his club with distinction.

He always tackled hard but fair and excelled in closing down his opposite number en route to goal. Fergus was glue-like in his marking, forceful in his tackling and was seldom found wanting with some of the best corner-forwards in the county. He was born in 1937 and was educated at Wexford C.B.S. His boyhood hero was the late Willie Goodison.

One of his best games playing with the Sarsfields was in the 1961 Co. Senior football final, winning versus the Starlights. Fergus gave a really spectacular performance with his high fielding and long kicking. His strength, endurance and attitude were special and he cleared his lines repeatedly from his patch. His late father, Eddie Hall, was a life-long member and supporter of the Sarsfields. Fergus played with the Wexford Minor footballers in 1955.

The best dual player he has seen in Wexford was Phil Wilson who was brilliant in both codes for many years. The best individual display he has seen was given by the late Pete Crowley for the Sarsfields in the 1961 Co. Senior football final versus the Starlights. It was a star performance. His eldest brother, the late Eamonn Hall, in his short career promised to be one of the best dual players to come from the town. Three other brothers, Dessie, Tony and Oliver, also played with the Sarsfields.

He first played football at adult level with the Sarsfields in 1955 versus St. Mary's (Rosslare) in the Junior football championship and last played for them in 1966. The four footballers he selects as the best he has seen playing with the Sarsfields were Eamonn Hall R.I.P., Tommy Nolan, Pete Crowley R.I.P. and Jas Kirwan. The four players he selects as the most difficult that he played on while with the Sarsfields were Joe O'Shaughnessy (Castletown), Harry O'Connor R.I.P. (Starlights), Patrick Leacy (Ballyhogue) and John O'Connor R.I.P. (Volunteers).

The two footballers he selects as the best he has seen in Ireland were Mick O'Connell (Kerry) and Pat Spillane (Kerry). The two footballers he selects as the best he has seen in Wexford were Frank 'Butch' Morris and Pete Crowley R.I.P.

He played Junior football as a substitute with Wexford in 1960 and came on in 1961, losing both to Offaly. He played Juvenile, Minor, Junior, Special Junior and Senior football with Sarsfields and Juvenile and Minor hurling with the Faythe Harriers. He also played Special Junior football for the Sarsfields when they lost two finals in 1964 and 1966. He won two Juvenile hurling medals in 1952 and 1953 with Faythe Harriers, one Juvenile football medal in 1953 and one Minor football medal in 1955 with Sarsfields. He won one Minor hurling medal (1955), one Special Junior football medal (1965) and one Senior football medal (1961), all with Sarsfields. The most exciting game of football that he played in was the 1961 Senior final versus the Starlights.

FINTAN CLIFFORD (CAMROSS)

Fintan Clifford, formerly from Hayestown near Taghmon and now residing at Kilmannon near Cleariestown, was in his day one of the best corner-backs playing in the Junior hurling championship. He was a very close and tenacious marker in his familiar left corner-back position. He played every game with gusto and determination and no task was too big where his beloved Camross was concerned.

He loved hurling and was fair and constructive in his duels with his opponent. When Fintan was playing his motto was 'thou shall not pass' and he didn't go in for the fancy stuff, just got that ball out of the danger zone as quickly as possible. Any forward who registered a score off him had to work hard before he was successful.

He was born in 1938 and was educated at Taghmon N.S. His boyhood hero was Aidan Morrissey R.I.P. (Camross). He believes Art Foley was a brilliant goalie in his day. Brendan Cummins at the present time is also outstanding.

The greatest defender he has ever seen was Bobby Rackard R.I.P., and the greatest forward he has ever seen was Christy Ring R.I.P. Two of the best dual players he has seen in Wexford were Paddy Kehoe and Andy Doyle R.I.P. Apart from Bobby Rackard R.I.P., other Wexford hurlers that impressed him over the years were Jim English R.I.P., Tim Flood, Tony Doran and Dan Quigley.

One of the best games of hurling he has seen in Wexford was the 1968 Co. Senior final, with Buffers Alley winning versus Faythe Harriers. One of his disappointments in his hurling career was losing the 1958 Co. Junior hurling final to Ferns.

His finest hour for Camross was in 1963 versus Adamstown in the New Ross District Junior hurling final. At left corner-back he was unbeatable with his composure, close marking and clever interceptions making him a star. The four hurlers that impressed him most in the New Ross Junior championship were Mosie Morrissey (Gusserane), Jimmy Galway (Adamstown), Pat Walsh R.I.P. (St. James') and Eamonn Doyle (Rathgarogue-Cushinstown).

He won three Junior hurling medals in the New Ross District. He played Minor hurling with Camross in 1956. Of the present-day hurlers, Tommy Walsh (Kilkenny), Henry Shefflin (Kilkenny), Richie Power (Kilkenny) and Damien Hayes (Galway) are all brilliant. The four Camross players he selects as the best he has seen playing with them over the years were Jim Dyce R.I.P., Jim Morrissey R.I.P., Willie Foley R.I.P. and Seamus Keevans R.I.P.

The four hurlers he would select as the most difficult that he played on while playing with Camross were Joe Nolan R.I.P. (Shamrocks), Paddy Whitty (Adamstown), Martin Nolan R.I.P. (Blackwater) and James Hendrick (RathgarogueThe greatest club team he has seen in Wexford in hurling was Rathnure in the early '70s.

He last played hurling with his club Camross in 1975 because of a knee injury. The two best dual players he has seen in Ireland were Jimmy Barry Murphy (Cork) and Ray Cummins (Cork). The three best hurlers he has seen in Wexford in the past 30 years were Larry O'Gorman, Tony Doran and Martin Storey.

FRANKIE TENNANT (ST. MARY'S, M'TOWN)

Frankie Tennant, who now resides a few hundred yards from Drinagh, was a top-class footballer with St. Mary's (Maudlintown). Along with brothers Nicky and Eddie R.I.P. they had a good understanding with the rest of the team. St. Mary's was founded in the mid '50s and in 1959 Frankie played his first game with them at Junior level. He continued to play with them until 1975.

Although his medal collection was nil, it didn't curtail him from enjoying every game he participated in. From a very young age Frankie was very much interested in the game of football, but as there was no Juvenile or Minor teams in his area he had to wait until he played Junior before he got his first chance to show off his talents. He liked playing in the half-back line where he had space to control his patch on the field.

He was educated at The Faythe N.S. and Wexford C.B.S. His boyhood hero was Ned Wheeler. Two of the best dual players he has seen in Wexford were Phil Wilson (Ballyhogue) and Tommy Nolan (Faythe Harriers and Sarsfields). The two best dual players he has seen in Ireland were Jimmy Barry Murphy (Cork) and Des Foley R.I.P. (Dublin).

In his opinion the best dual player he has seen with St. Mary's was Willie Carley, who was brilliant in both codes. It was great for the area when St. Mary's (Maudlintown) won their first Junior football title when they defeated Fethard in the Co. final in 1983. One of the best club teams he has seen over the years was the Duffry Rovers teams that won Co. Senior football titles seven times in a row from 1986 to 1992. They were a remarkable team to consistently play at the top level for so long.

The best goalie he has seen playing for Wexford was Jas Kirwan (Sarsfields). Of the present-day footballers he selects Colm Cooper (Kerry) as a class act and one of the greatest footballers he has seen along with Mick O'Connell. In Wexford, Redmond Barry is outstanding along with Colm Morris.

On the great hurling team in the '50s, Bobby Rackard R.I.P. and Ned Wheeler were his favourites. The game he selects as having his finest hour in was versus St. Anne's (Baldwinstown) in the '60s. The four footballers he selects as the best he has seen playing with St. Mary's were Larry O'Connor, Eddie O'Connor R.I.P., Willie Carley and Nicky Rossiter. The four footballers he selects as the most difficult that he played on while with St. Mary's were Nicky Newport (St. Fintan's), Frank Morris (Volunteers), Peter Doyle (Kilmore) and Terence O'Leary (Our Lady's Island).

The three footballers he selects as the best he has seen in Ireland were Mick O'Connell (Kerry), Matty McDonagh R.I.P. (Galway) and Colm Cooper (Kerry). The three footballers he selects as the best he has seen in Wexford were John Morris R.I.P., Willie Goodison R.I.P. and Paddy Kehoe. The most exciting game of football that he played in was St. Mary's versus St. Anne's. The best goalie he has seen in Ireland in football was John O'Leary (Dublin). The best half-back he has seen in football was Martin O'Connell (Meath).

HERBIE YOUNG (CASTLETOWN)

Herbie Young, who resides at Glenogue a few miles from Inch, was a formidable footballer with his club, Castletown, in the course of a fine career which was interrupted for a couple of years when he emigrated in the late '50s. He was back again in 1960 to assist his beloved Castletown to win Co. Junior football honours with victory versus Volunteers after a drawn game.

In 1961, 1962 and 1963 he was outstanding playing Senior with Castletown. In early 1965 misfortune turned his career upside down when a fracture of a bone in his foot was a long time in healing, so he had to retire from the game that he loved. It was tough sitting on the sideline in 1965 to see them winning their first Co. Senior football title and not being able to be a part of it. It was great to see them winning and going on to great things in the following years.

The Young family arrived in the county in 1947 during the big snow and it took them almost three days to arrive from their home base in Ballyroan in Co. Laois. They had to travel by horse and cart, a fair distance in the snow. He had three brothers that played and all were outstanding for Castletown - Billy, Cecil R.I.P. and Eamon. Herbie was born in 1939 and was educated in Ballyroan N.S. and Coolgreany N.S.

The best dual players he has seen in Wexford were Oliver Cullen and Phil Wilson. His finest hour in the Castletown jersey was versus Ballyhogue in the Senior football championship. At No. 5 he was outstanding and his judgement, his fielding and astute kicking made him a star performer. He first played Junior with Castletown when he was just 15 years old in 1954 and finished his career in 1965 because of injury.

The individual display he would select as the best he has seen at club level was by Freddie Cudlipp in the 1960 Co. Junior football final versus the Volunteers in the replay. The four Castletown footballers he selects as the best he has seen playing with them were Freddie Cudlipp, Andy Merrigan R.I.P., Seán Sheridan and Malachy Kane. The four footballers he selects as the most difficult he played on while with Castletown were Con O'Neill R.I.P. (Ferns), Willie Foley R.I.P. (Ballyhogue), Dan Kennedy (Kilrush) and Murt O'Sullivan R.I.P. (Kilanerin).

The two footballers he would select as the best he has seen in Ireland were Tommy Murphy R.I.P. (Laois) and Mick O'Connell. The two footballers he would select as the best he has seen in Wexford were Matty Forde and Andy Merrigan R.I.P. The best game of football he has seen in Wexford was Castletown versus Ballyhogue in 1965 in the drawn game.

He played Juvenile football with the Rockies in 1953, 1954 and 1955. He played Minor football with the Rockies in 1954 and 1955 before moving to England. The most exciting game of football that he played in was Castletown versus the Starlights in the 1960 Co. Junior football semi-final. He also played Minor football with Wexford in 1954 and 1955 before going to Manchester at 16 years old. He won one Juvenile Co. medal in the early '50s and one Minor football medal in 1953 with the Rockies. One of the best goalies he has seen in club football in Wexford was Mick Byrne (Castletown).

JAMES KIRWAN (ST. MARTIN'S)

James Kirwan, whose abode is now in Dublin, was a very early starter on the hurling scene. At 16 years of age while still a Juvenile he lined out with St. Martin's in a Junior hurling game versus Kilmore in the Wexford District championship. In 1948 the club went on to win the Co. title and James collected his first county medal as a substitute versus Oulart in the final.

He won his second medal in 1950 when he played with the St. Martin's Minor hurling team which won the title versus the Starlights. In 1954 he left the Piercestown area and moved to Dublin, but on occasions came back to hurl with St. Martin's. He last played with them in 1957 when they defeated the Shelmaliers in the Wexford District.

In 1958 he started playing with the famous Dublin club Faughs until 1964 when he gave up for business reasons. Many brilliant players played with Faughs in this period, to name just a few: Billy Dywer (Kilkenny), Jim Prior (Dublin and Tipperary) and Timmy Maher (Laois). James played Juvenile hurling with St. Martin's for three years in 1946, 1947 and 1948 and Minor hurling also for three years in 1948, 1949 and 1950, winning a Co. medal in the last year. In his hurling career he was a master-class wing half-back where his speed of thought, his footwork, his balance, his control and his striking ability stood out.

He loved his hurling but his illustrious career in business turned out to be more important. He first worked in the 'Irish Press' newspaper and then 'Commercial Printing'. He then attended the College of Technology and ended up as Managing Director of 'Smart Web Press'. In early 2012 he took over as captain of the K Club Golf.

He was born in 1932 and was educated at Piercestown N.S. and Wexford C.B.S. His boyhood hero was Willie Goodison R.I.P. His finest hour in the St. Martin's colours was versus St. Aidan's in the Co. Senior hurling championship when, playing on the goalscoring star Francis Fenlon, he gave a wonderful display, covering his area splendidly with verve, courage, skill and confidence.

The best dual player he has seen in Wexford was George O'Connor. His brother Frank won one Minor medal in 1950 before emigrating at a young age like many young people in those years. The best individual display he has seen at club level was by Peter Cullen versus Oulart in the 1948 Co. Junior hurling final. The four hurling players he selects as the best he has seen playing with St. Martin's were Patsy Boggan R.I.P., Ned Wheeler, George O'Connor and Peter Cullen R.I.P.

The four hurling players he would select as the most difficult that he played on while with St. Martin's were Jim English R.I.P., Oliver McGrath (Faythe Harriers), Pat Murphy (Ardcolm) and John Maddock R.I.P. (Geraldine O'Hanrahans). The two dual players he selects as the best he has seen in Ireland were Des Foley R.I.P. (Dublin) and Jimmy Barry Murphy (Cork).

His medals include one Wexford Co. Junior hurling, one Wexford Co. Minor hurling medal and won Corn Ceiteann and Senior medals with Faughs, Dublin. The best game of hurling he has seen in Wexford was Cloughbawn versus Rathnure in the 1949 Co. Senior final. It was a classic and it was the first time he had seen Tim Flood in action.

FR. JIM CURTIS (CLONGEEN)

Fr. Jim Curtis, originally from the town of New Ross, is now residing in Clongeen where he is enjoying his retirement from the priesthood. He was a much-travelled clergyman, serving the people in the areas where his ministry was required. He performed his duties as a priest with dedication, commitment and devotion. He was ordained to the priesthood in 1964 and he first spent some time in Brazil.

When he returned to Ireland in 1965 he was appointed to the parish of Camolin for ten months. He served for a while in Wexford town before returning to Brazil in 1973 for a second time. In 1977 he was sent to Gusserane and stayed there until 1980. He ministered in Poulpesty from 1982 until 1991, and then returned back to Camolin where he remained until 1999.

Finally, he was appointed to the parish of Clongeen where he served until his retirement in 2008. Fr. Jim continues to live in Clongeen where he has many friends. He was educated at St. Joseph's Christian Brothers School, New Ross, and St. Peter's College Seminary. He was and still is a great lover of Gaelic games and seldom if ever missed a game.

When in Camolin the players that impressed him the most were Peadar Roche, Micheál Furlong, Kevin Kavanagh and Gary Curley. When in Cloughbawn as club Secretary and Chairman, Tom Harrington, Tom Walsh, Ger Flood and John Kehoe (Clonleigh) were very good hurlers in his opinion. In 2007 the parish of Clongeen was illuminated with colour when the club won its first Co. Senior football title. It was a joyful and enthusiastic time for everyone in the area. The celebrations of the success went on for weeks on end. Páraic Curtis, Paddy Colfer and Colm Byrne just to name a few were heroes after victory.

The greatest goalkeeper he has seen in hurling was Tony Reddan (Tipperary). The two best dual players he has seen were the late Des Foley (Dublin) and Paddy Kehoe. In his youth Fr. Jim's boyhood hero was the late Nickey Rackard. His favourite hurlers of the great Wexford team in the 1950s were Tim Flood, Ned Wheeler and Nick O'Donnell R.I.P.

The three best hurlers he has seen in Ireland in the last 40 years were Brian Whelahan (Offaly), D.J. Carey (Kilkenny) and Henry Shefflin (Kilkenny). The three best hurlers he has seen in Wexford in the past 40 years were Martin Quigley (Rathnure), Tony Doran (Buffers Alley) and Seán Flood (Cloughbawn). The three Clongeen players of the 1960s and 1970s that impressed him the most were Con Donnelly, Paddy Bennett and Fred Casey.

Two of the present-day hurlers in Wexford he would select as the best he has seen are Keith Rossiter (Oulart-The Ballagh) and Richie Kehoe (Faythe Harriers). The best game of hurling he has seen in Wexford was the 1988 Co. Senior final between Rathnure and Buffers Alley, ending in a draw with Rathnure scoring 214 and Buffers Alley scoring 3-11. It was a close amd classic encounter between two brilliant teams.



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