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Friday 21 July 2017

YSI students attend conference

Kilkenny hurling manager Brian Cody with Meanscoil Gharmain students (from left) Peig Busher, Roisin Byrne, Ciara Nolan and Rosie Whelan
Kilkenny hurling manager Brian Cody with Meanscoil Gharmain students (from left) Peig Busher, Roisin Byrne, Ciara Nolan and Rosie Whelan
Suzanne McMullen, Programme Operations and Governance Manager, Young Social Innovators, Matt Doran, Cathaoirleach of Kilkenny County Council and Our Lady of Lourdes students, Grace Costello and Eimear O'Shea
Kayla Murray, Orla Fitzgerald, Chloe Furlong, Aoife Byrne and Eimear Lynch from Our Lady of Lourdes in New Ross

The work of students from across the county on YSI projects was featured at the Young Social Innovators Speak Out conference which took place in the Lyrath Estate Convention Centre in Kilkenny recently.

The youths were among 799 students from across the south east who attended the event.

The Speak Out Tour, supported by Ulster Bank, is part of the YSI of the Year Awards which challenge young people to think differently and come up with ways to tackle social issues affecting them and their communities. The following projects were highlighted by County Wexford students: Meanscoil Gharman in Enniscorthy (The Street Children of Bucharest), Presentation secondary school, Wexford (Through the Looking Glass), Our Lady of Lourdes, New Ross (Hear Say), Our Lady of Lourdes, New Ross (Water Wise), Ramsgrange Community School (Operation Consent and Active Minds), Gorey Community School (Pimp My Pavement, The Red Light Project, If They Say No, Let It Go), Loreto school, Wexford (Turn Off Smirnoff, Be a Charmer, Not a Harmer, Let's Talk About Sex), Bridgetown Vocational College (Promoting Female Participation in Sport), Good Counsel College, New Ross (Brain Train, Beauty is the Beast, Testicular Chancer an Inside Out).

CEO of Young Social Innovators, Rachel Collier said: 'YSI empowers young people to be social innovators recognising and harnessing their talents and ideas to address social need.

Giving young people opportunities to really consider the world around them and to innovate on issues that matter to them gives them skills for life and work as well as an understanding that what they do matters to society.'

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