New documentary tackles social inclusion

John Paul Doyle, Tadhg Hayes, Maureen Crowley, Janet O'Donoghue, Helena Cronin (centre row from left) Eileen Switzer, Anthony Jones, Amy O'Dea, Stephen Brosnan (back from left) James O'Sullivan, Tim Collins, Brendan O'Sullivan, Paul O'Sullivan, Batt Healy at the Malton, Killarney on Thursday. Photo by Michelle Cooper Galvin
John Paul Doyle, Tadhg Hayes, Maureen Crowley, Janet O'Donoghue, Helena Cronin (centre row from left) Eileen Switzer, Anthony Jones, Amy O'Dea, Stephen Brosnan (back from left) James O'Sullivan, Tim Collins, Brendan O'Sullivan, Paul O'Sullivan, Batt Healy at the Malton, Killarney on Thursday. Photo by Michelle Cooper Galvin
Attending the 'Hear Us Now' documentary pre-launch were Teresa O'Brien, Teresa O'Brien, Eileen Brosnan and Teresa Irwin at the Malton, Killarney on Thursday. Photo by Michelle Cooper Galvin

A short documentary tackling social inclusion for local adults with disabilities is due to be screened next week as part of a campaign to raise awareness of the issue.

Called 'Hear Us Now', the initiative was launched on Thursday by Kerry Parents and Friends Association and Saint John of God Kerry Services and it is due to be screened at The Mangerton Suite in the Malton Hotel on Thursday May 11 at 2pm.

The documentary is about young adults with intellectual disabilities leading normal lives, which highlights the challenges they and their families face.

The adults in question come from Killarney and its surrounding villages and towns and they attend day service programmes in Killarney at the aforementioned organisations where they receive training and support.

"The core idea behind 'Hear Us Now' is to communicate the message that people with intellectual disabilities are important and should be listened to," organisers state.

They say they are trying to raise awareness and generate support from the wider community on 'real' social inclusion.

"Real social inclusion essentially means interacting with others who are not paid staff, a family member, or other people with an intellectual disability," the organisers of the screening continue.

"It also means access to a paid job, social roles and relationships with non-disabled citizens. And it's about providing opportunities and the right amount of support to those who need it most to live independent lives.

"The aim of this initiative is also to encourage businesses to think about including a person with an intellectual disability in their work force and for the community to think about how to involve people in mainstream clubs, organisations, schools, colleges and all facets of community life."

Kerryman

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