independent

Friday 19 September 2014

O'Gorman to keep €99k Amnesty pay

Published 15/04/2014 | 05:30

  • Share
Colm O’Gorman

MEMBERS of Amnesty Ireland voted unanimously at their national conference at the weekend not to reduce the €99,089 salary of the organisation's director, Colm O'Gorman, by a whopping €64,000.

  • Share
  • Go To

MEMBERS of Amnesty Ireland voted unanimously at their national conference at the weekend not to reduce the €99,089 salary of the organisation's director, Colm O'Gorman, by a whopping €64,000.

The proposal had been to cut his pay to a figure in line with the €35,200 that is believed to be the average salary for other Amnesty employees.

Mr O'Gorman, who is based in North Wexford, said this week that he had no input into setting his salary. 'I don't think it's ever appropriate that a person paid a salary seeks to justify their salary,' he said. 'I don't have any input into it beyond any other employee. My salary is decided by the Board who are elected by the members.'

'I'm very proud to work for an organisation where there's that level of accountability and transparency. There should be nothing remarkable in an NGO (non-governmental organisation) that there would be a discussion on senior salaries. We publish information on salary bands every January, and detail the number of people within each band. We fully disclose the CEO's salary.'

Amnesty International Ireland has 25 to 30 staff in Ireland, and a large number of volunteers. Its membership has grown significantly in recent years to over 15,000. Upcoming campaigns will focus on stopping torture, and highlighting women's rights, as well as the human rights of people trying to get into Europe from countries such as Syria.

Mr. O'Gorman pointed out that Amnesty International doesn't take any money from governments for its campaigning and advocacy work. The Irish organisation has an annual budget of €4.2 million, with most of the money coming from fundraising. 'The only area where we take some government funding is in human rights education in Irish primary schools. We got €50,000 from the government for that work,' he said.

'Charities should be enormously transparent on where their funding goes, and the fact that this issue is discussed and decided by the membership is something to be proud of, and I'm proud to work in an organisation that does that.'

Enniscorthy Guardian

Read More

GrabOne Deals

News