Monday 31 August 2015

40 years of the mobile phone

Published 05/04/2013 | 11:00

American engineer Martin Cooper made the first mobile phone call 40 years ago in the middle of New York City, baffling passers-by. At 10 inches high and weighing 790g, the legendary original ‘brick’ was released for the general public in 1983. Photo: 
Reuters
American engineer Martin Cooper made the first mobile phone call 40 years ago in the middle of New York City, baffling passers-by. At 10 inches high and weighing 790g, the legendary original ‘brick’ was released for the general public in 1983. Photo: Reuters
Mobile phones were not truly ‘mobile’ until Motorola released their first ‘micro’ model in 1989. Pictured is one their relatively sleeker models from 1994, the Motorola TDMA Micro Digital Lite. Photo: Reuters
The Nokia 9000 was the first phone with email and internet browsing, making it a contender for the very first smartphone. But at a heavy 397g and a starting price tag of £950, the smartphone had a long way to before it became the ubiquitous force it is today. Photo: Reuters
The Nokia 3210 is one of the most successful handsets ever, selling around 160 million units and establishing the mobile as a must-have product for everyone. The Nokia 3210’s ‘candybar’ design and the inclusion of the video game ‘Snake’ became the exemplary format for mobile phones throughout the early 2000s.
The Blackberry revolutionised business on the go, with the phone’s round-the-clock email access and QWERTY keyboard. Pictured is one of their first colour models, the Blackberry 7520. Photo: Reuters
The super-stylish Razr made sleekness one of the most important qualities for a phone, with its “clamshell” style flip and the thinnest profile of any phone at the time. Photo: Reuters
One of the first successful smartphones, complete with a touchscreen, Windows operating system and MP4 player capabilities, the MPx paved the way for things to come. Photo: Getty Images
The phone that changed it all. With Steve Jobs' announcement that Apple were ‘reinvent[ing] the phone’, mobiles became no longer just phones but ‘handheld computers’. And with its multi-touch screen, buttons were no longer seen as a necessary part of a phone. Photo: Reuters
The very first Android phone was a response to Apple’s unprecedented success with the iPhone. Note how the phones since the iPhone are a lot less diverse in their designs. Photo: Reuters
Samsung has proven itself to be one of the iPhone’s biggest competitors. Pictured is the latest Galaxy model, the Samsung Galaxy S4, scheduled for release in April. Photo: Reuters
Samsung has proven itself to be one of the iPhone’s biggest competitors. Pictured is the latest Galaxy model, the Samsung Galaxy S4, scheduled for release in April. Photo: Reuters

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