Opinion

Sunday 30 April 2017

Teaching children together, regardless of class or creed, helps to build a community

Having the majority of the children in a locality educated together, regardless of ability, class or creed, is one of those things that binds people together. And this has benefits for everyone way beyond the mere education of children (Stock Image)
Having the majority of the children in a locality educated together, regardless of ability, class or creed, is one of those things that binds people together. And this has benefits for everyone way beyond the mere education of children (Stock Image)

Yvonne Hogan

It is a truth universally acknowledged that every culchie in the capital, as soon as they become a parent, fantasises about moving home. We dream of leaving the commute, the congestion and the enormous mortgage behind and heading for the old country to live a simpler life in the midst of our extended families, giving our children the same free-range childhood we enjoyed.

The fantasy gains traction around certain life events - returning to work from maternity leave, the first time your child gets sick and you realise you can't go to work, the first time your child corrects your accent, "it's ThursDAY mummy, not ThursDA" - and it peaks when you are trying to get your kid into a school. Because when it comes to schools, Dublin really is a foreign land.

I can't say I wasn't warned. As soon as you have delivered a baby, Dublin folk start warning you about the schools. "You need to put her name down for all the schools in the area right this minute," you are told. "The good ones are impossible to get into."

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