Friday 2 December 2016

No longer can we ignore the plight of refugees

Published 04/04/2015 | 02:30

A boy carries two children as he evacuates them from a site hit by what activists said was a barrel bomb dropped by forces loyal to Syria's President Bashar al-Assad in Aleppo's al-Fardous district April 2, 2015. REUTERS/Rami Zayat
A boy carries two children as he evacuates them from a site hit by what activists said was a barrel bomb dropped by forces loyal to Syria's President Bashar al-Assad in Aleppo's al-Fardous district April 2, 2015. REUTERS/Rami Zayat
A boy carries two children as he evacuates them from a site hit by what activists said was a barrel bomb dropped by forces loyal to Syria's President Bashar al-Assad in Aleppo's al-Fardous district (REUTERS/Rami Zayat)
A boy carries his belongings at a site hit by what activists said was a barrel bomb dropped by forces loyal to Syria's President Bashar al-Assad in Aleppo's al-Fardous district on Thursday (REUTERS/Rami Zayat)
A woman carrying a child reacts at a damaged site after what activists said was shelling by forces loyal to Syria's president Bashar al-Assad on a mosque in Idlib city, after rebels took control of the area on Friday (REUTERS/Ammar Abdallah)

Nearly five years into the Syrian civil war there seems a capacity for the world to look the other way. This despite it being described as the greatest humanitarian crisis since the Second World War.

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The scale of fatalities - upwards of 230,000, mostly civilians - appears to elicit a response which is one of paralysed despair. Why is this?

How come the crisis - which began in 2011 with anti-government protests and escalated into a full-scale civil war, causing the biggest refugee crisis in modern history - is finding it difficult to stay in the headlines of our newspapers?

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