Friday 22 September 2017

My abiding memory is stench of death in typhoon aftermath

A boy drinks water from a hose outside bunkhouses for Typhoon Haiyan survivors, which were built by humanitarian agency ACF (Action Against Hunger) International, in Tacloban city in central Philippines
A boy drinks water from a hose outside bunkhouses for Typhoon Haiyan survivors, which were built by humanitarian agency ACF (Action Against Hunger) International, in Tacloban city in central Philippines
Typhoon Haiyan survivors perform during a dance competition organised by South Korean soldiers as they commemorate the victims of last year's typhoon, in Tacloban city in central Philippines
An effigy of Philippine President Benigno Aquino burns during a protest, coinciding with a commemoration ceremony for Typhoon Haiyan victims who perished

Peter Power

This weekend marked the first anniversary of Super Typhoon Haiyan in the Philippines - the biggest ever recorded storm to make landfall in a populated area. Thanks to the generosity of Irish people, disaster-affected communities are now showing real signs of recovery and long term growth.

This was no ordinary Hurricane. It was a Category 5+. Literally, off the scale.

In the days after the Typhoon, I flew to Tacloban City to oversee UNICEF's emergency response. It is hard to convey the scenes of devastation I witnessed. Super Typhoon Haiyan destroyed up to 90pc of the hospitals, schools and homes in its path. From the air, for hundreds of miles, the devastation was near total.

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