Wednesday 16 August 2017

How Ireland can guard against a firestorm

As we seek a way ahead for residents of defective buildings, it is time for an independent regulator, writes Catherine Martin

The Priory Hall development in north Dublin. What can be done to support innocent victims and also give future purchasers some assurance that the State, however belated, now has this crisis firmly under control, and will never again be found asleep at the supervisory wheel? Photo: PA
The Priory Hall development in north Dublin. What can be done to support innocent victims and also give future purchasers some assurance that the State, however belated, now has this crisis firmly under control, and will never again be found asleep at the supervisory wheel? Photo: PA

Catherine Martin

When it comes to shoddy and defective construction of homes in Ireland during the boom times, occupiers are still discovering gross inadequacies - to their personal cost.

Some young families who have moved into their first homes have received the news that their apparently beautiful homes have inherent structural defects or present significant health and safety risks, rendering them fire traps.

With this unsettling news comes unanticipated financial grief and heartache. Their lives are turned upside down and they are hurled into a heartless financial pressure zone - all as a result of the deeds of greed-driven cowboy builders.

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