Sunday 11 December 2016

We must move on after inquiry

Published 28/06/2015 | 02:30

This week, the former Minister for Finance, Charlie McCreevy, is to appear as a witness, to be followed by the much anticipated evidence of his successor and former Taoiseach, Brian Cowen, who is also scheduled to account for his stewardship as leader the week after.
This week, the former Minister for Finance, Charlie McCreevy, is to appear as a witness, to be followed by the much anticipated evidence of his successor and former Taoiseach, Brian Cowen, who is also scheduled to account for his stewardship as leader the week after.

The Banking Inquiry will this week enter a critical and potentially deeply political phase, with long-awaited evidence to be finally provided by key political figures during the boom and ruinous bust.

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To date, the inquiry has blown hot and cold: the early stages were largely uneventful with the evidence, in particular, of several bankers proving to be far from satisfactory; similarly, the account given by the former European Central Bank President, Jean-Claude Trichet, has only served to further confuse the issues involved and, if anything, has further added to the cynicism of a weary and austerity-fatigued citizenry.

However, the recent appearance before the inquiry of senior civil servants has shed some much needed light on events during what was by any yardstick an extraordinary time with far-reaching consequences for the country.

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