Thursday 25 May 2017

Troubadour of torment helped us laugh and cry

There was a jagged honesty and rawness at the core of Cohen's work giving it the frightening force of purity.
There was a jagged honesty and rawness at the core of Cohen's work giving it the frightening force of purity.
Editorial

Editorial

Anguish, loss and disillusion are strange building blocks from which to fashion international fame: you would have to be a craftsman of the highest guild to pull that one off, and yet Leonard Cohen did.

The self-appointed poet of pain's influence was such that after the bewitching hour, whether you wished them to or not; his words had a way of wafting their way through the lino-covered floorboards, and damp hallways ,of every bedsit, and low rent flat, across the country.

For all the misery, and dislocation, he still had time to: "laugh, and to cry, and to cry and to laugh, about it all again..." Perhaps that was the real magic: tears and smiles like rainbows and sunshine, were never too far off. He conjured up a spell potent enough to weave across the generations. His 'Hallelujah' may have been broken, but it was sufficient to move hearts of every age.

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