Tuesday 26 September 2017

Tánaiste is running out of time to explain

'If a law has been breached, then surely an inquiry is necessary to maintain the integrity of the process? Otherwise, the Justice Minister leaves herself open to charges of selectivity.' Photo: Tom Burke
'If a law has been breached, then surely an inquiry is necessary to maintain the integrity of the process? Otherwise, the Justice Minister leaves herself open to charges of selectivity.' Photo: Tom Burke
Editorial

Editorial

Consistency and accuracy are believed to be two of the building blocks of credibility. Given that this is accepted across management, it was troubling to hear Tánaiste and Justice Minister Frances Fitzgerald announce that she does not plan to hold an investigation into the leaking of sections of transcripts in the O’Higgins inquiry.

Remember, these matters are deemed so grave that neither the minister nor the Garda Commissioner are prepared to comment on them. So why therefore does she feel the leaks should not be investigated – after all, it is an offence? The reason given is that she does not believe an investigation would find the culprits. This is quite an admission and raises questions which undermine competence. If a law has been breached, then surely an inquiry is necessary to maintain the integrity of the process? Otherwise, the Justice Minister leaves herself open to charges of selectivity.

For instance, last January, Gsoc interviewed two senior gardaí after their numbers were found on the phone records of two journalists. At that time, it was reported that Gsoc and the gardaí were carrying out no less than seven investigations into the work of journalists, and how they sourced information. 

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