Sunday 20 August 2017

O'Rorke case highlights end-of-life complexity

A jury faced with a “faithful, honest, decent woman….faced with an immense dilemma” has discharged its duty by finding Gail O’Rorke not guilty in relation to the death of Bernadette Forde, who died of an overdose of drugs acquired over the internet from Mexico in June 2011
A jury faced with a “faithful, honest, decent woman….faced with an immense dilemma” has discharged its duty by finding Gail O’Rorke not guilty in relation to the death of Bernadette Forde, who died of an overdose of drugs acquired over the internet from Mexico in June 2011
Editorial

Editorial

A jury faced with a "faithful, honest, decent woman….faced with an immense dilemma" has discharged its duty by finding Gail O'Rorke not guilty in relation to the death of Bernadette Forde, who died of an overdose of drugs acquired over the internet from Mexico in June 2011.

This was a very difficult case for everyone concerned and the jury, in keeping with the vast majority of juries in this country, took immense care in deliberating and coming to a decision on this difficult and controversial issue.

Euthanasia is, as we know, a very complex issue, but the law is clear and unambiguous: while suicide itself is not a criminal offence, aiding or abetting a suicide is, and anyone assisting in such an endeavour faces prosecution.

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