Tuesday 17 January 2017

Love, anguish and intrigue in the life of a literary artist

Published 16/10/2005 | 00:11

BANVILLE: He is a compelling figure, and remains disdainful of the trappings of 'this image-obsessed age'. Photo: Julien Behal
BANVILLE: He is a compelling figure, and remains disdainful of the trappings of 'this image-obsessed age'. Photo: Julien Behal
LITERARY AWARD: Banville in 2002 when he was a finalist in the 'Sunday Independent' Irish Novel of the Year Award, with Dr Robin O'Reilly, one of the judges. Right, Patricia Quinn

HIS NOVELS are dense, literary and relatively plotless whereas his private life has the faint whiff of a chick-lit blockbuster bristling with intrigue and unlikely passion and romance.

  • Go To

John Banville, winner of the most prestigious literary prize in the English-speaking world, the Man Booker, is almost as mysterious as the 14 novels he has written, novels which remain largely ignored and unread by all but the chosen few who favour highliterary style over such traditional features as plot, character and storyline.

Even The Book of Evidence, which was supposed to be about the infamous Malcolm McArthur Case is plotless and enigmatic, even though the original story, filled with characters like Charlie Haughey and his Attorney General, Paddy Connolly, and involving two brutal murders is probably among the most sensational tales of modern Ireland.

Please sign in or register with Independent.ie for free access to Opinions.

Sign In

Read More

Don't Miss

Editor's Choice