Saturday 23 September 2017

It's 'Advantage Ireland' - but a long road looms

Irish Prime Minister Enda Kenny listens to questions during a media conference at an EU summit in Brussels. (AP Photo/Olivier Matthys)
Irish Prime Minister Enda Kenny listens to questions during a media conference at an EU summit in Brussels. (AP Photo/Olivier Matthys)
Editorial

Editorial

Any way you look at things, Enda Kenny was entitled to hold his head high leaving the opening of EU-Brexit talks in Brussels. Ireland's cause in these talks, scheduled to take another 23 months to complete, is up in lights. It is a very rare occasion when the word "Ireland" features so prominently in so many EU leaders' statements.

The most eye-catching assertion was special recognition of the 1998 Good Friday Agreement and the ultimate potential for a united Ireland in the fullness of time. There is good sense attaching to the need to deal with the prospect of the end of partition - some day into the future.

It means that in such an eventuality Northern Ireland would not find itself in an EU membership queue, some distance behind many long-time aspiring nations. But it is probably the most long-term of the key priorities which the Dublin Government must now doggedly pursue.

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