Tuesday 19 September 2017

Death and CEOs: The only certainties

You wonder if you should have taken another route and tried to be a millionaire or a top boss
You wonder if you should have taken another route and tried to be a millionaire or a top boss
Brendan O'Connor

Brendan O'Connor

When you get to my age two things of note start happening to your contemporaries. They start to become CEOs and they start to die. The cruel irony is that the ones who get to be CEO are the guys who don't deserve it, and so are the ones who die.

It was all very simple when you hadn't grown up with the guys who became CEOs and the guys who died. Because then you just accepted it. They were older, this was the kind of thing that happened to older people. And you only ever knew them as older people so you figured they had it sussed in some way, and that they were more ready to die. And it would never happen to you would it? But when they are your peers you know too much. You know them only as idiots who don't deserve to be in charge of anything and regular guys who didn't deserve to die young.

And when it starts happening to your peers you wonder on one hand if you should have taken another route, and tried to be a millionaire or a top boss, and on the other you wonder briefly, if you might die young. But you dismiss it quickly. Not full of shit enough to be a boss and too lucky to die. Dying young, you can convince yourself, is still something that happens to other people. Even though many of the things that only happen to other people have happened to me and my family and friends, you never really get used to it. You still think it's a fluke, that it was meant to happen to someone else. And you still think you have some kind of immunity from the awful things that only ever happen to other people. So on we go and we act like we have all the time in the world.

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