Tuesday 26 September 2017

Trust is the key factor as global firms ditch digital adverts

Fake news and placing ads next to dubious content could change the face of the media
'While Google makes the bulk of its money from products such as search, it also makes a sizeable amount from letting third-party publishers use its ad-serving technology such as AdSense and DoubleClick, which allows anyone with a website or blog to make money from advertising'
'While Google makes the bulk of its money from products such as search, it also makes a sizeable amount from letting third-party publishers use its ad-serving technology such as AdSense and DoubleClick, which allows anyone with a website or blog to make money from advertising'

John McGee

The first three months of 2017 have been anything but good for Google and Facebook, the two online behemoths of the digital world, both of which stride the global advertising landscape with ruthless intent and an enviable and slick ability to vacuum up cash at a pace that would make James Dyson's team of engineers green with envy.

An integral part of the daily lives of billions of people around the world, they now stand accused of unwittingly facilitating the funding of radical terrorist organisations and providing the oxygen and platforms that allow the spread of fake-news websites.

In doing so, they have now found themselves under the shocking and unwelcome spotlight after a light was shone on the seedy underbelly of the online world that is often inhabited by jihadist and other terrorist support groups, as well as so-called alt-right and supremacist websites pedalling malicious misinformation and misogyny.

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