Wednesday 20 September 2017

This is the way republicans vent their spleen

Anyone who raises uncomfortable truths about Sinn Fein will be called a liar and worse, writes Matt Treacy

Brave: Mairia Cahill went public about her treatment at the hands of the republican movement. Photo: Gerry Mooney
Brave: Mairia Cahill went public about her treatment at the hands of the republican movement. Photo: Gerry Mooney

Matt Treacy

There is a scene in James Ivory's film version of Kazuo Ishiguro's The Remains of the Day in which the obsequious butler Stevens, portrayed by Anthony Hopkins, is subjected to questioning on issues of the day by one of Lord Darlington's guests.

The point being on the part of his interlocutor to prove that proles like Stevens were not fit to be given a say on matters of state, hence the fallacy of democracy. Stevens brings the interrogation to an end by saying: "It is not my place to be curious about such matters."

That may seem a strange analogy for the obscurantism that grips Sinn Fein from time to time, but it is not entirely misplaced. You believe what you are told, and ask no questions, nor be overly curious.

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