Opinion Comment

Sunday 20 August 2017

The system helps working mums - but we pay a price

'It must be hugely irritating to be left behind in a gloomy office doing all the paperwork while the new mothers of this world waft around dimly-lit bedrooms in their dressing gowns, blissed out on pregnancy hormones and beatifically sniffing their infants' downy heads, like something out of a pre-Raphaelite oil painting' (stock photo)
'It must be hugely irritating to be left behind in a gloomy office doing all the paperwork while the new mothers of this world waft around dimly-lit bedrooms in their dressing gowns, blissed out on pregnancy hormones and beatifically sniffing their infants' downy heads, like something out of a pre-Raphaelite oil painting' (stock photo)

Liz Kearney

There are few things in life as depressing as the sight of two females arguing about how best to be a modern woman, while the lads sit back and watch.

That was the spectacle that greeted viewers of Brendan O'Connor's 'Cutting Edge' on Wednesday night, where the host sat in near-silence as his female guests got stuck in. During a debate about working mothers, broadcaster Alison O'Connor argued, reasonably, for more support for this put-upon cohort of employees.

Meanwhile her opponent, journalist Niamh Horan, argued equally reasonably that workplaces are not charities designed to accommodate women who are, as she put it, "riding the system".

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