Tuesday 25 April 2017

Teach Muslim girls about sex to stop the next wave of radicalisation

'The biggest fear for any parent whose daughter has gone out there is that they might become sexual jihadis'. Stock photo: Getty
'The biggest fear for any parent whose daughter has gone out there is that they might become sexual jihadis'. Stock photo: Getty

Azi Ahmed

Reading about 'Jihadi Jack', the radicalised teenager who missed doughnuts but not his parents when leaving home to fight the 'holy war', got me thinking how vulnerable teenagers are when they think they discover that powerful thing - someone that understands them.

As an isolated Muslim teenager growing up in Oldham, near Manchester, the highlight of my life was going into my bedroom, closing the door, turning on the radio and reading a Mills & Boon.

I wasn't allowed out, like my brothers, so the only time I had away from family was in this world. I'd read my selection of Mills & Boon books and fantasise that one day a doctor would come into my parents' kebab shop (where I worked) and a romance would erupt between us.

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