Wednesday 7 December 2016

Stopping maternity care for mothers six weeks after giving birth is unrealistic

Cecily Begley

Published 08/11/2016 | 02:30

‘If women are well, babies and families will be well’. (Picture posed) Photo: Getty Images/Blend Images
‘If women are well, babies and families will be well’. (Picture posed) Photo: Getty Images/Blend Images

The MAMMI study (Maternal health And Maternal Morbidity in Ireland) was inspired by one woman, back in 2010, who told a midwife - now one of the MAMMI research team - that she leaked urine, could not control when she passed wind, and leaked faeces.

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This had been happening to her since she gave birth to her first child two years earlier. Telling her story wasn't easy, and it didn't happen the first time she met this midwife, who was a complete stranger to her. It took a second and third visit, and importantly, time - time for the woman to develop trust in the midwife, and time during the visit for the woman to tell her story. The extent of this woman's misery was plain to see and painful to listen to as she sobbed her heart out, spilling out the misery she had endured in silence for the previous two years.

Every part of this woman's life had been made miserable by these health problems. At work she was afraid she would 'get caught out' or 'caught short', and at home she found her relationship with her partner was changing for the worse due to her fear of telling him or having an accident during intimate times.

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