Monday 5 December 2016

Richard McElligott: Public interest can be harnessed to apply aspirations of Rising to our modern society

Richard McElligott

Published 26/03/2016 | 02:30

The commemorations outside the GPO in 1966. Photo: Independent Ireland Newspapers/NLI Collection
The commemorations outside the GPO in 1966. Photo: Independent Ireland Newspapers/NLI Collection

In the months following the Rising, the writer James Stephens published 'The Insurrection in Dublin', one of the most vivid eyewitness accounts of the rebellion.

  • Go To

Having been present in St Stephen's Green when the Rising broke out, Stephens was curious to get a sense of his fellow citizens' reactions and he spent most of Easter week travelling around Dublin city centre, constantly listening to people's discussions. He observed one reaction which in retrospect was extremely significant.

By the Wednesday evening, he detected that a feeling of pride and growing respect for the rebels was coming to the fore. As Stephens put it, there was "almost a feeling of gratitude towards" the Irish Volunteers for "holding out for a little while, for had they been beaten on the first or second day, the city would have been humiliated to the soul".

Please sign in or register with Independent.ie for free access to Opinions.

Sign In

Read More

Don't Miss

Editor's Choice